British Military Intervention in The Sierra Leone Civil War

British military intervention in the Sierra Leone Civil War occurred from May 2000. Although small numbers of British personnel had been deployed previously – in a non-combatant evacuation in 1998 and in the form of a small number of unarmed observers in 1999 – Operation Palliser (May 2000) was the first large-scale intervention by British forces during the Sierra Leone Civil War.

Read more about British Military Intervention In The Sierra Leone Civil War:  Previous British Deployments, Build-up To The Intervention, Operation Palliser, Mission Expansion, Operation Kukri, Training The SLA, Operation Barras, Confronting The RUF, Ceasefire, Impact

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