Brain–computer Interface - Low-cost BCI-based Interfaces

Low-cost BCI-based Interfaces

Recently a number of companies have scaled back medical grade EEG technology (and in one case, NeuroSky, rebuilt the technology from the ground up) to create inexpensive BCIs. This technology has been built into toys and gaming devices; some of these toys have been extremely commercially successful like the NeuroSky and Mattel MindFlex.

  • In 2006 Sony patented a neural interface system allowing radio waves to affect signals in the neural cortex.
  • In 2007 NeuroSky released the first affordable consumer based EEG along with the game NeuroBoy. This was also the first large scale EEG device to use dry sensor technology.
  • In 2008 OCZ Technology developed a device for use in video games relying primarily on electromyography.
  • In 2008 the Final Fantasy developer Square Enix announced that it was partnering with NeuroSky to create a game, Judecca.
  • In 2009 Mattel partnered with NeuroSky to release the Mindflex, a game that used an EEG to steer a ball through an obstacle course. By far the best selling consumer based EEG to date.
  • In 2009 Uncle Milton Industries partnered with NeuroSky to release the Star Wars Force Trainer, a game designed to create the illusion of possessing the force.
  • In 2009 Emotiv Systems released the EPOC, a 14 channel EEG device that can read 4 mental states, 13 conscious states, facial expressions, and head movements. The EPOC is the first commercial BCI to use dry sensor technology, which can be dampened with a saline solution for a better connection.
  • In November 2011 Time Magazine selected "necomimi" produced by Neurowear as one of the best inventions of the year. The company announced that it expected to launch a consumer version of the garment, consisting of cat-like ears controlled by a brain-wave reader produced by NeuroSky, in spring 2012.
  • In March 2012 g.tec introduced the intendiX-SPELLER, first commercially available BCI system for home use which can be used to control computer games and apps. It can detect different brain signals with an accuracy of 99%. g.tec has hosted several workshop tours to demonstrate the intendiX system and other hardware and software to the public, such as a g.tec workshop tour of the US West Coast during September 2012.

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