Baseball Hall of Fame

Baseball Hall Of Fame

The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum is an American history museum and hall of fame, located at 25 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York and operated by private interests. It serves as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, displays baseball-related artifacts and exhibits, and honors those who have excelled in playing, managing, and serving the sport. The Hall's motto is "Preserving History, Honoring Excellence, Connecting Generations."

The word Cooperstown is often used as shorthand (or a metonym) for the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Read more about Baseball Hall Of Fame:  History, Inductees, The Museum, Unauthorized Sale of Items in Collection, Non-induction of Banned Players

Famous quotes containing the words baseball, hall and/or fame:

    Compared to football, baseball is almost an Oriental game, minimizing individual stardom, requiring a wide range of aggressive and defensive skills, and filled with long periods of inaction and irresolution. It has no time limitations. Football, on the other hand, has immediate goals, resolution on every single play, and a lot of violence—itself a highlight. It has clearly distinguishable hierarchies: heroes and drones.
    Jerry Mander, U.S. advertising executive, author. Four Arguments for the Elimination of Television, ch. 15, Morrow (1978)

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    Anna Quindlen (20th century)

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    James Thurber (1894–1961)