Ballets By Jean Cocteau

Ballets By Jean Cocteau

Jean Maurice Eugène Clément Cocteau (; 5 July 1889 – 11 October 1963) was a French poet, novelist, dramatist, designer, playwright, artist and filmmaker. Cocteau is best known for his novel Les Enfants terribles (1929), and the films Blood of a Poet (1930), Les Parents terribles (1948), Beauty and the Beast (1946) and Orpheus (1949). His circle of associates, friends and lovers included Kenneth Anger, Pablo Picasso, Jean Hugo, Jean Marais, Henri Bernstein, Yul Brynner, Marlene Dietrich, Coco Chanel, Erik Satie, Igor Stravinsky, María Félix, Édith Piaf and Raymond Radiguet.

Read more about Ballets By Jean Cocteau:  Early Life, Early Career, Friendship With Raymond Radiguet, The Human Voice, Maturity, Honours and Awards, Filmography, Bibliography

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    Jean Cocteau (1889–1963)

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