Automatic Control

Automatic control is the application of control theory for regulation of processes without direct human intervention. In the simplest type of an automatic control loop, a controller compares a measured value of a process with a desired set value, and processes the resulting error signal to change some input to the process, in such a way that the process stays at its set point despite disturbances. This closed-loop control is an application of negative feedback to a system. The mathematical basis of control theory was begun in the 18th century, and advanced rapidly in the 20th.

Designing a system with features of automatic control generally requires the feeding of electrical or mechanical energy to enhance the dynamic features of an otherwise sluggish or variant, even errant system. The control is applied by regulating the energy feed.

Read more about Automatic Control:  Examples, Components, Functions, Further Reading

Famous quotes containing the words automatic and/or control:

    Predictions of the future are never anything but projections of present automatic processes and procedures, that is, of occurrences that are likely to come to pass if men do not act and if nothing unexpected happens; every action, for better or worse, and every accident necessarily destroys the whole pattern in whose frame the prediction moves and where it finds its evidence.
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    We long for our father. We wear his clothes, and actually try to fill his shoes. . . . We hang on to him, begging him to teach us how to do whatever is masculine, to throw balls or be in the woods or go see where he works. . . . We want our fathers to protect us from coming too completely under the control of our mothers. . . . We want to be seen with Dad, hanging out with men and doing men things.
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