Anne Sexton

Anne Sexton (November 9, 1928, Newton, Massachusetts – October 4, 1974, Weston, Massachusetts) was an American poet, known for her highly personal, confessional verse. She won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry in 1967. Themes of her poetry include her suicidal tendencies, long battle against depression and various intimate details from her private life, including her relationships with her husband and children.

Read more about Anne Sexton:  Early Life and Family, Poetry, Death, Content and Themes of Work, Subsequent Controversy

Famous quotes by anne sexton:

    Houses haunt me.
    That last house!
    How it sat like a square box!
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    Your coat in my closet,
    your bright stones on my hand,
    the gaudy fur animals
    I do not know how to use,
    settle on me like a debt.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    God,
    that washerwoman
    who walks out
    when you’re clean
    but not ironed.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    For I could not read or speak and on the long nights I could not turn the moon off or count the lights of cars across the ceiling.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)

    You danced with me never saying a word.
    Instead the serpent spoke as you held me close.
    The serpent, that mocker, woke up and pressed against me
    like a great god and we bent together
    like two lonely swans.
    Anne Sexton (1928–1974)