Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley

Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. Best known for his novels including Brave New World and a wide-ranging output of essays, Huxley also edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories, poetry, travel writing, film stories and scripts. Huxley spent the later part of his life in the United States, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death.

Aldous Huxley was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist, and he was latterly interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism. He is also well known for advocating and taking psychedelics.

By the end of his life Huxley was widely acknowledged as one of the pre-eminent intellectuals of his time and respected as an important researcher into visual communication and sight-related theories as well.

Read more about Aldous Huxley:  Early Life, Career, Association With Vedanta, Eyesight, Personal Life, Death, Awards, Film Adaptations of Huxley's Work

Famous quotes by aldous huxley:

    Perhaps it’s good for one to suffer.... Can an artist do anything if he’s happy? Would he ever want to do anything? What is art, after all, but a protest against the horrible inclemency of life?
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    Oh, how desperately bored, in spite of their grim determination to have a Good Time, the majority of pleasure-seekers really are!
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    Ignore death up to the last moment; then, when it can’t be ignored any longer, have yourself squirted full of morphia and shuffle off in a coma. Thoroughly sensible, humane and scientific, eh?
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    Morality is always the product of terror; its chains and strait-waistcoats are fashioned by those who dare not trust others, because they dare not trust themselves, to walk in liberty.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    If only people would realize that moral principles are like measles.... They have to be caught. And only the people who’ve got them can pass on the contagion.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)