Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley

Aldous Leonard Huxley (26 July 1894 – 22 November 1963) was an English writer and one of the most prominent members of the famous Huxley family. Best known for his novels including Brave New World and a wide-ranging output of essays, Huxley also edited the magazine Oxford Poetry, and published short stories, poetry, travel writing, film stories and scripts. Huxley spent the later part of his life in the United States, living in Los Angeles from 1937 until his death.

Aldous Huxley was a humanist, pacifist, and satirist, and he was latterly interested in spiritual subjects such as parapsychology and philosophical mysticism. He is also well known for advocating and taking psychedelics.

By the end of his life Huxley was widely acknowledged as one of the pre-eminent intellectuals of his time and respected as an important researcher into visual communication and sight-related theories as well.

Read more about Aldous Huxley:  Early Life, Career, Association With Vedanta, Eyesight, Personal Life, Death, Awards, Film Adaptations of Huxley's Work

Famous quotes by aldous huxley:

    If only people would realize that moral principles are like measles.... They have to be caught. And only the people who’ve got them can pass on the contagion.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    Speed, it seems to me, provides the one genuinely modern pleasure.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    God isn’t compatible with machinery and scientific medicine and universal happiness. You must make your choice. Our civilization has chosen machinery and medicine and happiness.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    When truth is nothing but the truth, it’s unnatural, it’s an abstraction that resembles nothing in the real world. In nature there are always so many other irrelevant things mixed up with the essential truth. That’s why art moves you—precisely because it’s unadulterated with all the irrelevancies of real life.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    Industrial man—a sentient reciprocating engine having a fluctuating output, coupled to an iron wheel revolving with uniform velocity. And then we wonder why this should be the golden age of revolution and mental derangement.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)