Adrienne Rich

Adrienne Rich

National Book Award
1974
Bollingen Prize
2003

Griffin Poetry Prize
2010

Adrienne Cecile Rich (May 16, 1929 – March 27, 2012) was an American poet, essayist and feminist. She was called "one of the most widely read and influential poets of the second half of the 20th century", and was credited with bringing "the oppression of women and lesbians to the forefront of poetic discourse."

Her first collection of poetry, A Change of World, was selected by the senior poet W. H. Auden for the Yale Series of Younger Poets Award; he went on to write the introduction to the published volume. Rich famously declined the National Medal of Arts, protesting the United States House of Representatives and Speaker Gingrich's vote to end funding for the National Endowment for the Arts.

Read more about Adrienne Rich:  Selected Awards and Honors

Famous quotes by adrienne rich:

    I do not think [poetry] is more, or less, necessary than food, shelter, health, education, decent working conditions. It is as necessary.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    The word ‘revolution’ itself has become not only a dead relic of Leftism, but a key to the deadendedness of male politics: the ‘revolution’ of a wheel which returns in the end to the same place; the ‘revolving door’ of a politics which has ‘liberated’ women only to use them, and only within the limits of male tolerance.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    How we dwelt in two worlds
    the daughters and the mothers
    in the kingdom of the sons.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    indolence read as abnegation,
    slattern thought styled intuition,
    every lapse forgiven, our crime
    only to cast too bold a shadow
    or smash the mold straight off.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)

    The worker can unionize, go out on strike; mothers are divided from each other in homes, tied to their children by compassionate bonds; our wildcat strikes have most often taken the form of physical or mental breakdown.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)