Abstraction

Abstraction is a process by which concepts are derived from the usage and classification of literal ("real" or "concrete") concepts, first principles, or other methods. "An abstraction" is the product of this process – a concept that acts as a super-categorical noun for all subordinate concepts, and connects any related concepts as a group, field, or category.

Abstractions may be formed by reducing the information content of a concept or an observable phenomenon, typically to retain only information which is relevant for a particular purpose. For example, abstracting a leather soccer ball to the more general idea of a ball retains only the information on general ball attributes and behavior, eliminating the other characteristics of that particular ball.

Read more about Abstraction:  Origins, Thought Process, Referents, Abstraction Used in Philosophy, Abstraction in Linguistics, Abstraction in Mathematics, Abstraction in Computer Science, Abstraction in Psychology, The Neurology of Abstraction, Abstraction in Art

Famous quotes containing the word abstraction:

    When truth is nothing but the truth, it’s unnatural, it’s an abstraction that resembles nothing in the real world. In nature there are always so many other irrelevant things mixed up with the essential truth. That’s why art moves you—precisely because it’s unadulterated with all the irrelevancies of real life.
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    Before abstraction everything is one, but one like chaos; after abstraction everything is united again, but this union is a free binding of autonomous, self-determined beings. Out of a mob a society has developed, chaos has been transformed into a manifold world.
    Novalis [Friedrich Von Hardenberg] (1772–1801)

    By “object” is meant some element in the complex whole that is defined in abstraction from the whole of which it is a distinction.
    John Dewey (1859–1952)