2004 Boston Red Sox Season

2004 Boston Red Sox Season

The Boston Red Sox 2004 season was the 103rd Major League Baseball season for the Boston Red Sox franchise. Managed under Terry Francona, the team finished with a 98–64 record (three games behind the New York Yankees in the American League East Division). The Red Sox played in Fenway Park to a local attendance of 2,837,294 fans.

They clinched the AL wild card to assure a berth in the 2004 post-season. They swept the Anaheim Angels in the first round to enter the ALCS against the Yankees for the second straight year.

As Boston entered the fourth game of the ALCS, they had fallen three games behind the Yankees, including a Game Three loss by the score of 19–8.

Trailing 4-3 in the 9th inning of Game 4, they embarked upon an unprecedented (in baseball) comeback from a three-game deficit to defeat the New York Yankees in the series. After the ALCS, the Red Sox swept the Cardinals to win their first World Series since 1918 (86 years).

Read more about 2004 Boston Red Sox Season:  Offseason, Farm System

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