1997–98 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup - Final

Final

13 May 1998
20:45 CEST (UTC+2)
Chelsea 1–0 VfB Stuttgart Råsunda Stadium, Stockholm
Attendance: 30,216
Referee: Stefano Braschi (Italy)
Zola 70' Lineups

Read more about this topic:  1997–98 UEFA Cup Winners' Cup

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Famous quotes containing the word final:

    Fine art, that exists for itself alone, is art in a final state of impotence. If nobody, including the artist, acknowledges art as a means of knowing the world, then art is relegated to a kind of rumpus room of the mind and the irresponsibility of the artist and the irrelevance of art to actual living becomes part and parcel of the practice of art.
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