1992 New York Giants Season

The 1992 New York Giants season was the 68th season for the club in the National Football League. The Giants finished in fourth place in the National Football Conference East Division with a 6–10 record. Head coach Ray Handley was fired after this season, when the Giants finished 1–6 after starting the season 5–4.

Injuries helped to mar the Giants' season. Starting quarterback Phil Simms, who had regained the position after spending most of 1991 at second string behind Jeff Hostetler, suffered a severe elbow injury in week 4 and did not return. Hostetler returned to the starting lineup after Simms' injury before he too would be lost due to a concussion suffered against the Philadelphia Eagles. The Giants were then forced to turn to a pair of rookies, Kent Graham and Dave Brown, but Graham suffered from elbow and shoulder problems, and Brown suffered a broken right thumb. Hostetler returned for the final two games of the season, a win over the Kansas City Chiefs and a loss to the Philadelphia Eagles.

Perhaps the most catastrophic injury was the torn Achilles' tendon suffered by future Hall of Fame linebacker Lawrence Taylor in Week 10, as the Giants only won once more after the injury. It was the second consecutive year that an injury to Taylor ended his season prematurely (a sprained knee in Week 13 of the 1991 season forced Taylor to miss the final game of the regular season and a previous game against the Cincinnati Bengals).

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