Zora Neale Hurston

Zora Neale Hurston (January 7, 1891 – January 28, 1960) was an American folklorist, anthropologist, and author during the time of the Harlem Renaissance. Of Hurston's four novels and more than 50 published short stories, plays, and essays, she is best known for her 1937 novel Their Eyes Were Watching God.

Read more about Zora Neale HurstonPolitics, Selected Bibliography, Film and Television

Other articles related to "zora neale hurston, hurston, zora":

List Of Feminist Rhetoricians - Zora Neale Hurston
... (1891–1960) Hurston was an African-American author and part of the Harlem Renaissance ... Her best known work is the novel Their Eyes Were Watching God ...
Eatonville, Florida - History
... Zora Neale Hurston grew up there ... Every winter, Eatonville stages its annual Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts and Humanities ... The Zora Neale Hurston Library opened in January 2004 ...
Zora Neale Hurston - Film and Television
... In 1989 PBS aired a drama based on Hurston's life titled Zora is My Name! ... to Brother, set in part during the Harlem Renaissance, featured Hurston (portrayed by Aunjanue Ellis) ... April 9, 2008 PBS broadcast a 90-minute documentary Zora Neale Hurston Jump at the Sun written and produced by filmmaker Kristy Andersen, as part of the ...

Famous quotes by zora neale hurston:

    She pulled in her horizon like a great fish-net. Pulled it from around the waist of the world and draped it over her shoulder, so much of life in its meshes! She called in her soul to come and see.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    It was a weak spot in any nation to have a large body of disaffected people within its confusion.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    The sun, the hero of every day, the impersonal old man that beams as brightly on death as on birth, came up every morning and raced across the blue dome and dipped into the sea of fire every evening. Water ran down hill and birds nested.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    He looked like the love thoughts of women. He could be a bee to a blossom—a pear tree blossom in the spring. He seemed to be crushing scent out of the world with his footsteps. Crushing aromatic herbs with every step he took. Spices hung about him. He was a glance from God.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)

    I am her friend, and her tongue is in my mouth. I can speak her sentiments for her, though Ethel Waters can do very well indeed in speaking for herself.
    Zora Neale Hurston (1891–1960)