Year

A year (from Old English gēar) is the orbital period of the Earth moving around the Sun. For an observer on the Earth, this corresponds to the period it takes the Sun to complete one course throughout the zodiac along the ecliptic.

In astronomy, the Julian year is a unit of time, defined as 365.25 days of 86400 SI seconds each (no leap seconds).

There is no universally accepted symbol for the year as a unit of time. The International System of Units does not propose one. A common abbreviation in international use is a (for Latin annus), in English also y or yr.

Due to the Earth's axial tilt, the course of a year sees the passing of the seasons, marked by changes in weather, hours of daylight, and consequently vegetation and fertility. In temperate and subpolar regions, generally four seasons are recognized: spring, summer, autumn and winter, astronomically marked by the Sun reaching the points of equinox and solstice, although the climatic seasons lag behind their astronomical markers. In some tropical and subtropical regions it is more common to speak of the rainy (or wet, or monsoon) season versus the dry season.

A calendar year is an approximation of the Earth's orbital period in a given calendar. A calendar year in the Gregorian calendar (as well as in the Julian calendar) has either 365 (common years) or 366 (leap years) days.

The word "year" is also used of periods loosely associated but not strictly identical with either the astronomical or the calendar year, such as the seasonal year, the fiscal year or the academic year, etc. By extension, the term year can mean the orbital period of any planet: for example, a "Martian year" is the time in which Mars completes its own orbit. The term is also applied more broadly to any long period or cycle, such as the "Great Year".

Read more about Year:  Etymology, Seasonal Year, Calendar Year, Symbol

Other articles related to "year, years":

298
... Year 298 (CCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar ... At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Faustus and Gallus (or, less frequently, year 1051 Ab urbe condita) ... The denomination 298 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years ...
Guatemala City - Climate
... Guatemala City is generally mild, almost springlike, throughout the course of the year ... while the dry season covers the remainder of the year ... Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year Record high °C (°F) 28.7 (83.7) 30.7 (87.3) 29.9 (85.8) 31.0 (87.8) 29.5 (85.1) 28.6 (83.5 ...
595
... Year 595 (DXCV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar ... The denomination 595 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years ...
Julian Calendar - New Year's Day
... The Roman calendar began the year on 1 January, and this remained the start of the year after the Julian reform ... calendars were aligned to the Julian calendar, they started the new year on different dates ... The Alexandrian calendar in Egypt started on 29 August (30 August after an Alexandrian leap year) ...
"Great Years" - Galactic Year
... The Galactic year is the time it takes Earth's solar system to revolve once around the galactic center ... It comprises roughly 230 million Earth years ...

Famous quotes containing the word year:

    In another year I’ll have enough money saved. Then I’m gonna go back to my hometown in Oregon and I’m gonna build a house for my mother and myself. And join the country club and take up golf. And I’ll meet the proper man with the proper position. And I’ll make a proper wife who can run a proper home and raise proper children. And I’ll be happy, because when you’re proper, you’re safe.
    Daniel Taradash (b. 1913)

    The golden mean in ethics, as in physics, is the centre of the system and that about which all revolve, and though to a distant and plodding planet it be an uttermost extreme, yet one day, when that planet’s year is completed, it will be found to be central.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    The year growing ancient,
    Not yet on summer’s death, nor on the birth
    Of trembling winter, the fairest flowers o’the season
    Are our carnations and streaked gillyvors.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)