Workplace Authority

The Workplace Authority is an Australian Federal Government statutory agency that commenced operations on 1 July 2007, replacing, and expanding on the role of, the Office of the Employment Advocate (OEA), which had been in place since 1997. The Workplace Authority has been superseded by the Fair Work Ombudsman and Fair Work Australia (since renamed the Fair Work Commission) as of 1 July 2009.

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Other articles related to "workplace authority, workplace":

Workplace Authority - Overview
... The primary role of the OEA was to accept the lodgement of Australian workplace agreements ... The Workplace Relations Amendment (A Stronger Safety Net) Act 2007 received royal assent on 28 June 2007, establishing the Workplace Authority and introducing the Fairness Test ... The Workplace Authority Director, Barbara Bennett is responsible for assessing whether agreements lodged on or after 7 May 2007 pass the Fairness Test, however she also agreed to be ...
Fairness Test
... The "fairness test" was a concept of the Australian Act of Parliament, the Workplace Relations Amendment (A Stronger Safety Net) Act 2007 ... Act saw the renaming of the then Office of Workplace Services, which became the Workplace Ombudsman, and the creation of the Workplace Authority, combining the former Office of the Employment ... The Fairness Test applied to all Collective Agreements (CAs) and Australian Workplace Agreements (AWAs) lodged with the Workplace Authority between 7 May 2007 ...

Famous quotes containing the words authority and/or workplace:

    ... each of them is inhabited by a bland demon, as the German metaphysicians used to call that which gets into a man and makes him creative, not so forcibly that it turns them away from criticism, but valid enough to give them the right to speak with the authority of artists.
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