Worked

Some articles on worked:

Gaston Lachaise - Move To America
... her husband and married Lachaise ) Lachaise emigrated to the United States in 1906 and worked in Boston for H ... In 1912 Lachaise went to New York City and worked as an assistant to the sculptor Paul Manship ... He worked mostly in bronze ...
Mary Garden
... She worked closely with Jules Massenet, in whose operas she excelled ... Between 1910-1932 Garden worked in several opera houses in Chicago ... She first worked with the Chicago Grand Opera Company (1910–1913) and then joined the Chicago Opera Association in 1915, ultimately becoming the company's director in 1921 ...
John Prescott Ellis - Career
... He then worked on his uncle George H ... in 1979, and later returned to NBC, where he worked for the elections unit ... In the last few years Ellis has worked in investment banking and is a partner in Kerr Creek Partners, and also is a conributing columnist to Real Clear Politics ...
Edwin P. Martz
... He worked with William Pickering at Lowell Observatory in 1937 creating the first color photographs of Mars ... He then worked at the Dearborn Observatory from 1939 until 1941 ... Army and worked on a tracking system for missiles using telescopes ...
Dave D. Taylor
... He worked for id Software between 1993 and 1996, and was during the time involved with the development of Doom and Quake ... He founded and worked as president of the small game company Crack dot Com from 1996 to 1998 ... Between 1998 and 2001 he worked for Transmeta ...

Famous quotes containing the word worked:

    I had a wonderful job. I worked for a big model agency in Manhattan.... When I got on the subway to go to work, it was like traveling into another world. Oh, the shops were beautiful, we had Bergdorf’s, Bendel’s, Bonwit’s, DePinna. The women wore hats and gloves. Another world. At home, it was cooking, cleaning, taking care of the kids, going to PTA, Girl Scouts. But when I got into the office, everything was different, I was different.
    Estelle Shuster (b. c. 1923)

    The weakness of modern tragedy ... [is that] transgression against the social code is made to bring destruction, as though the social code worked our irrevocable fate.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    We thus worked our way up this river, gradually adjusting our thoughts to novelties, beholding from its placid bosom a new nature and new works of men, and, as it were with increasing confidence, finding nature still habitable, genial, and propitious to us; not following any beaten path, but the windings of the river, as ever the nearest way for us. Fortunately, we had no business in this country.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)