Worked

Some articles on worked:

John Prescott Ellis - Career
... He then worked on his uncle George H ... in 1979, and later returned to NBC, where he worked for the elections unit ... In the last few years Ellis has worked in investment banking and is a partner in Kerr Creek Partners, and also is a conributing columnist to Real Clear Politics ...
Mary Garden
... She worked closely with Jules Massenet, in whose operas she excelled ... Between 1910-1932 Garden worked in several opera houses in Chicago ... She first worked with the Chicago Grand Opera Company (1910–1913) and then joined the Chicago Opera Association in 1915, ultimately becoming the company's ...
Gaston Lachaise - Move To America
... her husband and married Lachaise ) Lachaise emigrated to the United States in 1906 and worked in Boston for H ... In 1912 Lachaise went to New York City and worked as an assistant to the sculptor Paul Manship ... He worked mostly in bronze ...
Dave D. Taylor
... He worked for id Software between 1993 and 1996, and was during the time involved with the development of Doom and Quake ... He founded and worked as president of the small game company Crack dot Com from 1996 to 1998 ... Between 1998 and 2001 he worked for Transmeta ...
Edwin P. Martz
... He worked with William Pickering at Lowell Observatory in 1937 creating the first color photographs of Mars ... He then worked at the Dearborn Observatory from 1939 until 1941 ... Army and worked on a tracking system for missiles using telescopes ...

Famous quotes containing the word worked:

    Oh, I realize it’s a penny here and a penny there, but look at me: I’ve worked myself up from nothing to a state of extreme poverty.
    Arthur Sheekman, U.S. screenwriter. Norman McLeod. Groucho Marx as himself, in Monkey Business (film)

    Fasten your hair with a golden pin,
    And bind up every wandering tress;
    I bade my heart build these poor rhymes:
    It worked at them, day out, day in,
    Building a sorrowful loveliness
    Out of the battles of old times.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    The weakness of modern tragedy ... [is that] transgression against the social code is made to bring destruction, as though the social code worked our irrevocable fate.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)