Wore Dark Blue

Some articles on wore, blue, wore dark blue, dark blue:

History Of The Royal Marines - Uniforms
... aside their easily-stained red coats and wore the loose "slop" clothing of the British sailors (then known as Jack Tars) ... It is recorded that at Trafalgar many marines fought in their undress checked shirts and blue trousers ... York and Albany's Maritime Regiment of Foot (1664–1689) wore yellow (probably yellow-brown) coats with red breeches and black felt hats ...
Caspian Blue - History of Blue - The Blue Uniform
... William, Elector of Brandenburg, was one of the first rulers to gave his army blue uniforms ... Most German soldiers wore dark blue uniforms until the First World War, with the exception of the Bavarians, who wore light blue ... the 18th century saw the widespread use of blue military uniforms ...
La Grande Armée - Forces of The Grande Armée - Imperial Guard - Infantry of The Guard
... The Grenadiers à Pied wore a dark blue habit long (coat with long tails) with red turnbacks, epaulettes and white lapels ... The Chasseurs à Pied wore a dark blue habit long (coat with long tails) with red turnbacks, red epaulettes fringed green and white lapels ... On campaign, the Chasseurs often wore dark blue trousers ...

Famous quotes containing the words blue, wore and/or dark:

    When the inhabitants of some sequestered island first descry the “big canoe” of the European rolling through the blue waters towards their shores, they rush down to the beach in crowds, and with open arms stand ready to embrace the strangers. Fatal embrace! They fold to their bosoms the vipers whose sting is destined to poison all their joys; and the instinctive feeling of love within their breasts is soon converted into the bitterest hate.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    He wore like a jewel a lemon-hued lynx
    With sand-waves loving her brow.
    Gwendolyn Brooks (b. 1917)

    An American, a Negro ... two souls, two thoughts, two unreconciled strivings; two warring ideals in one dark body, whose dogged strength alone keeps it from being torn asunder.
    —W.E.B. (William Edward Burghardt)