Willow Springs, Fayette County, Texas

Willow Springs is an unincorporated community in northeastern Fayette County, Texas, United States.

It has been named Zapp, Rock House, and German Settlement.

Other articles related to "texas":

Rio Grande - History
... disputed border between Mexico and the nascent Republic of Texas Mexico marked the border at the Nueces River ... part of the rationale for the US invasion of Mexico in 1846, after Texas had been admitted as a new state ... marked the boundary between Mexico and the United States from the twin cities of El Paso, Texas, and Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, to the Gulf of Mexico ...
Japanese American Internment - Facilities - List of Camps - Justice Department Detention Camps
... Italian detainees in addition to Japanese Americans Crystal City, Texas Fort Lincoln Internment Camp Fort Missoula, Montana Fort Stanton, New Mexico Kenedy, Texas Kooskia, Idaho Santa Fe, New Mexico Seagoville, Texas ...
Rio Grande - Crossings
... Other notable border towns are the Texas/Coahuila pairings of Del Rio–Ciudad Acuña and Eagle Pass–Piedras Negras ...
Texas - Sports
... Main article Sports in Texas Further information List of Texas sports teams, and List of University Interscholastic League events While American football has long been considered "king" in the state, Texans ... Within the "Big Four" professional leagues, Texas has two NFL teams (the Dallas Cowboys and the Houston Texans), two Major League Baseball teams (the Texas ... Outside of the "Big Four" leagues, Texas also has one WNBA team (the San Antonio Silver Stars) and two Major League Soccer teams (the Houston Dynamo and FC Dallas) ...
List Of Facilities Named After Lyndon Johnson
... the United States, including the following Lake LBJ, a lake in Texas Lyndon B ... Johnson Freeway, an Interstate freeway in Texas Lyndon B ... Johnson National Grassland in Texas LBJ School of Public Affairs, a public affairs graduate school at the University of Texas Lyndon B ...

Famous quotes containing the words texas and/or willow:

    Worn down by the hoofs of millions of half-wild Texas cattle driven along it to the railheads in Kansas, the trail was a bare, brown, dusty strip hundreds of miles long, lined with the bleaching bones of longhorns and cow ponies. Here and there a broken-down chuck wagon or a small mound marking the grave of some cowhand buried by his partners “on the lone prairie” gave evidence to the hardships of the journey.
    —For the State of Kansas, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    Ah! I have penetrated to those meadows on the morning of many a first spring day, jumping from hummock to hummock, from willow root to willow root, when the wild river valley and the woods were bathed in so pure and bright a light as would have waked the dead, if they had been slumbering in their graves, as some suppose. There needs no stronger proof of immortality. All things must live in such a light. O Death, where was thy sting? O Grave, where was thy victory, then?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)