William S. Richardson School of Law

An institution of the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa in Honolulu, in the U.S. state of Hawaiʻi, the William S. Richardson School of Law is a public law school.

Named after its patriarch, former Hawaiʻi State Supreme Court Chief Justice William S. Richardson, a zealous advocate of Hawai'ian culture, it is the state's only law school.

Richardson subsequently augments its regime of legal studies by placing special emphasis on fields of law of particular importance to Hawaiʻi and the surrounding Pacific and Asian region, including Native Hawaiian Law, Pacific-Asian Legal Studies, Environmental Law, and maritime law. Embodying Hawaiian values, its mission is to provide an "excellent" legal education across this regime "to highly qualified and diverse students in a collaborative, multidisciplinary educational community that is deeply committed to teaching, scholarship, public service, ethical responsibility, and the pursuit of social and economic justice."

A member of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS), the school is accredited by the Council of the Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar of the American Bar Association (ABA).

It offers a Juris Doctor, with certificates available in Native Hawaiian Law, Pacific-Asian Legal Studies, and Environmental Law, with students able to matriculate either full-time or part-time; and a LLM.

In 2012, U.S. News & World Report ranked Richardson 106th best.

Read more about William S. Richardson School Of Law:  William S. Richardson, Ethos, Curriculum, Dual Degrees, Joint Legal Education Program, Faculty, Student Organizations, Moot Court Teams, Law School Traditions, Notable Alumni

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