Who is zelda fitzgerald?

Zelda Fitzgerald

Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (July 24, 1900 – March 10, 1948), born Zelda Sayre ("Sayre" is pronounced to rhyme with "fair") in Montgomery, Alabama, was an American novelist and the wife of writer F. Scott Fitzgerald. She was an icon of the 1920s—dubbed by her husband "the first American Flapper". After the success of his first novel, This Side of Paradise (1920), the Fitzgeralds became celebrities. The newspapers of New York saw them as embodiments of the Jazz Age and the Roaring Twenties: young, seemingly wealthy, beautiful.

Read more about Zelda Fitzgerald.

Some articles on zelda fitzgerald:

F. Scott Fitzgerald - Life and Career - Zelda Fitzgerald
... Fitzgerald was commissioned a second lieutenant in the infantry and assigned to Camp Sheridan outside of Montgomery, Alabama ... While at a country club, Fitzgerald met and fell in love with Zelda Sayre (1900–1948), the daughter of an Alabama Supreme Court judge and the "golden girl," in Fitzgerald's terms, of Montgomery ... The war ended in 1918, before Fitzgerald was ever deployed, and upon his discharge he moved to New York City hoping to launch a career in advertising lucrative ...
Zelda Fitzgerald - Legacy - Critical Reappraisal
... biography, scholars and critics began to look at Zelda's work in a new light ... Scott Fitzgerald scholar Matthew Bruccoli wrote, "Save Me the Waltz is worth reading partly because anything that illuminates the career of F ... Scott Fitzgerald is worth reading—and because it is the only published novel of a brave and talented woman who is remembered for her defeats." But as Save Me the Waltz was ...

Famous quotes containing the words zelda fitzgerald and/or fitzgerald:

    Most people hew the battlements of life from compromise, erecting their impregnable keeps from judicious submissions, fabricating their philosophical drawbacks from emotional retractions and scalding marauders in the boiling oil of sour grapes.
    Zelda Fitzgerald (1900–1948)

    His was a great sin who first invented consciousness. Let us lose it for a few hours.
    —F. Scott Fitzgerald (1896–1940)