Who is Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart?

  • (noun): Prolific Austrian composer and child prodigy; master of the classical style in all its forms of his time (1756-1791).
    Synonyms: Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (, ), baptismal name Johannes Chrysostomus Wolfgangus Theophilus Mozart (27 January 1756 – 5 December 1791), was a prolific and influential composer of the Classical era.

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Some articles on Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart:

Lillian Fuchs - Recordings
... at the Harvard Musical Association (in the sound archives of the Harvard Musical Association) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Divertimento for String Trio in Eb, K.563 ... (Koch CD 3-7004-2) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Duos for Violin and Viola, K423, K.424 ... (Columbia LP MS 6292/ML 5692) Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Duo No ...
Charles Munch Discography - Video of Charles Münch On DVD - DVD With The Boston Symphony On ICA
90 1958 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Symphony No. 1959 ... Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Masonic Funeral Music K477/479a 1959 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Symphony No ...
Lisette Oropesa - Repertory
... Götterdämmerung Metropolitan Opera 2009 Susanna Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Le nozze di Figaro (The Marriage of Figaro) Metropolitan Opera 2009 Lucia Gaetano Donizetti Lucia di Lammermoor New Jersey Opera 2010 ...
List Of Austrian Composers
... Habsburg Empire music director in Vienna in the 1890s and 1900s Leopold Mozart (1719–1787) – Classical-era composer, violinist, author of influential treatise on playing the violin Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756. 18 in B-flat major by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Walter Rabl (1873–1940) – Viennese composer, conductor and teacher of vocal music Carl Georg Reutter (1708 ... Xaver Süssmayr (1766–1803) – Classical-era composer student of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Georg Christoph Wagenseil (1715–1777) – Classical-era composer, harpsichordist, and organist ...
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart - Works, Musical Style, and Innovations - Köchel Catalogue
... For unambiguous identification of works by Mozart, a Köchel catalogue number is used ... This is a unique number assigned, in regular chronological order, to every one of his known works ...

Famous quotes containing the words wolfgang amadeus mozart, wolfgang amadeus, amadeus mozart, mozart, wolfgang and/or amadeus:

    As death, when we come to consider it closely, is the true goal of our existence, I have formed during the last few years such close relations with this best and truest friend of mankind, that his image is not only no longer terrifying to me, but is indeed very soothing and consoling! And I thank my God for graciously granting me the opportunity ... of learning that death is the key which unlocks the door to our true happiness.
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791)

    As death, when we come to consider it closely, is the true goal of our existence, I have formed during the last few years such close relations with this best and truest friend of mankind, that his image is not only no longer terrifying to me, but is indeed very soothing and consoling! And I thank my God for graciously granting me the opportunity ... of learning that death is the key which unlocks the door to our true happiness.
    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791)

    My great-grandfather used to say to his wife, my great- grandmother, who in turn told her daughter, my grandmother, who repeated it to her daughter, my mother, who used to remind her daughter, my own sister, that to talk well and eloquently was a very great art, but that an equally great one was to know the right moment to stop.
    —Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756–1791)

    Mozart has the classic purity of light and the blue ocean; Beethoven the romantic grandeur which belongs to the storms of air and sea, and while the soul of Mozart seems to dwell on the ethereal peaks of Olympus, that of Beethoven climbs shuddering the storm-beaten sides of a Sinai. Blessed be they both! Each represents a moment of the ideal life, each does us good. Our love is due to both.
    Henri-Frédéric Amiel (1821–1881)

    Are we not also married to conscience which we would love to get rid of often enough since it is more bothersome than a man or a woman ever could become?
    —Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749–1832)

    Think of the wonderful circles in which our whole being moves and from which we cannot escape no matter how we try. The circler circles in these circles....
    —E.T.A.W. (Ernst Theodor Amadeus Wilhelm)