Who is William Jennings Bryan?

William Jennings Bryan

William Jennings Bryan (March 19, 1860 – July 26, 1925) was a leading American politician from the 1890s until his death. He was a dominant force in the liberal wing of the Democratic Party, standing three times as its candidate for President of the United States (1896, 1900 and 1908). He served in Congress briefly as a Representative from Nebraska and was the 41st United States Secretary of State under President Woodrow Wilson (1913–1915), taking a pacifist position on the World War. Bryan was a devout Christian, a supporter of popular democracy, and an enemy of the gold standard as well as banks and railroads. He was a leader of the silverite movement in the 1890s, a peace advocate, a prohibitionist, and an opponent of Darwinism on religious and humanitarian grounds. With his deep, commanding voice and wide travels, he was one of the best known orators and lecturers of the era. Because of his faith in the wisdom of the common people, he was called "The Great Commoner."

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William Jennings Bryan - Legacy - Honors
... This section needs additional citations for verification Bryan County, Oklahoma is named after him ... Bryan Memorial Hospital (now BryanLGH Medical Center) of Lincoln, Nebraska, and Bryan College located in Dayton, Tennessee, are also named for William Jennings Bryan ... The William Jennings Bryan House in Nebraska was named a U.S ...

Famous quotes containing the words jennings bryan, bryan and/or jennings:

    Anglo-Saxon civilization has taught the individual to protect his own rights; American civilization will teach him to respect the rights of others.
    —William Jennings Bryan (1860–1925)

    Do you know I believe that [William Jennings] Bryan will force his nomination on the Democrats again. I believe he will either do this by advocating Prohibition, or else he will run on a Prohibition platform independent of the Democrats. But you will see that the year before the election he will organize a mammoth lecture tour and will make Prohibition the leading note of every address.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)

    The humblest citizen of all the land, when clad in the armor of a righteous cause, is stronger than all the hosts of error.
    —William Jennings Bryan (1860–1925)