Who is Willard Van Orman Quine?

  • (noun): United States philosopher and logician who championed an empirical view of knowledge that depended on language (1908-2001).
    Synonyms: Quine, W. V. Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 – December 25, 2000) (known to intimates as "Van") was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition. From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement. He filled the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard from 1956 to 1978. A recent poll conducted among analytic philosophers named Quine as the fifth most important philosopher of the past two centuries. He won the first Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 1993, for "his systematical and penetrating discussions of how learning of language and communication are based on socially available evidence and of the consequences of this for theories on knowledge and linguistic meaning."

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Some articles on Willard Van Orman Quine:

De Dicto And de Re - Representing de Dicto and de Re in Modal Logic - Willard Van Orman Quine
... Willard Van Orman Quine refers to D ... Kaplan, who in turn credits Montgomery Furth for the term vivid designator in his paper Reference Modality ...
Duhem–Quine Thesis - Willard Van Orman Quine
... Quine, on the other hand, in "Two Dogmas of Empiricism", presents a much stronger version of underdetermination in science ... Hence all our knowledge, for Quine, would be epistemologically no different from ancient Greek gods, which were posited in order to account for experience ... Quine even believed that logic and mathematics can also be revised in light of experience, and presented quantum logic as evidence for this ...

Famous quotes containing the words van orman quine, willard van orman, willard van, orman quine, quine, orman, willard and/or van:

    The line that I am urging as today’s conventional wisdom is not a denial of consciousness. It is often called, with more reason, a repudiation of mind. It is indeed a repudiation of mind as a second substance, over and above body. It can be described less harshly as an identification of mind with some of the faculties, states, and activities of the body. Mental states and events are a special subclass of the states and events of the human or animal body.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Different persons growing up in the same language are like different bushes trimmed and trained to take the shape of identical elephants. The anatomical details of twigs and branches will fulfill the elephantine form differently from bush to bush, but the overall outward results are alike.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Our talk of external things, our very notion of things, is just a conceptual apparatus that helps us to foresee and control the triggerings of our sensory receptors in the light of previous triggering of our sensory receptors.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    One man’s antinomy is another man’s falsidical paradox, give or take a couple of thousand years.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    The lore of our fathers is a fabric of sentences.... It is a pale gray lore, black with fact and white with convention. But I have found no substantial reasons for concluding that there are any quite black threads in it, or any white ones.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Different persons growing up in the same language are like different bushes trimmed and trained to take the shape of identical elephants. The anatomical details of twigs and branches will fulfill the elephantine form differently from bush to bush, but the overall outward results are alike.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    You made me hate myself.
    Gilbert Ralston, U.S. screenwriter, and Daniel Mann. Willard (Bruce Davison)

    Babe, you know how these things go, it’s like a crap game. When you’re hot you shoot everything, you shoot the works. Well, right now baby, I’m so hot I’m burning up all over.
    —Gus Van Sant, U.S. screenwriter, and Dan Yost. Bob Hughes (Matt Dillon)