Who is Willard Van Orman Quine?

  • (noun): United States philosopher and logician who championed an empirical view of knowledge that depended on language (1908-2001).
    Synonyms: Quine, W. V. Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 – December 25, 2000) (known to intimates as "Van") was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition. From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement. He filled the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard from 1956 to 1978. A recent poll conducted among analytic philosophers named Quine as the fifth most important philosopher of the past two centuries. He won the first Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 1993, for "his systematical and penetrating discussions of how learning of language and communication are based on socially available evidence and of the consequences of this for theories on knowledge and linguistic meaning."

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Some articles on Willard Van Orman Quine:

Duhem–Quine Thesis - Willard Van Orman Quine
... Quine, on the other hand, in "Two Dogmas of Empiricism", presents a much stronger version of underdetermination in science ... Hence all our knowledge, for Quine, would be epistemologically no different from ancient Greek gods, which were posited in order to account for experience ... Quine even believed that logic and mathematics can also be revised in light of experience, and presented quantum logic as evidence for this ...
De Dicto And de Re - Representing de Dicto and de Re in Modal Logic - Willard Van Orman Quine
... Willard Van Orman Quine refers to D ... Kaplan, who in turn credits Montgomery Furth for the term vivid designator in his paper Reference Modality ...

Famous quotes containing the words van orman quine, willard van orman, willard van, orman quine, quine, orman, willard and/or van:

    My position is a naturalistic one; I see philosophy not as an a priori propaedeutic or groundwork for science, but as continuous with science. I see philosophy and science as in the same boat—a boat which, to revert to Neurath’s figure as I so often do, we can rebuild only at sea while staying afloat in it. There is no external vantage point, no first philosophy.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    We do not learn first what to talk about and then what to say about it.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    One man’s antinomy is another man’s falsidical paradox, give or take a couple of thousand years.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Treating ‘water’ as a name of a single scattered object is not intended to enable us to dispense with general terms and plurality of reference. Scatter is in fact an inconsequential detail.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Irrefragability, thy name is mathematics.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    It makes no sense to say what the objects of a theory are,
    beyond saying how to interpret or reinterpret that theory in another.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    And such the trust that still were mine,
    Though stormy winds swept o’er the brine,
    Or though the tempest’s fiery breath
    Roused me from sleep to wreck and death.
    In ocean cave, still safe with Thee
    The germ of immortality!
    And calm and peaceful shall I sleep,
    Rocked in the cradle of the deep.
    —Emma Hart Willard (1787–1870)

    Irrefragability, thy name is mathematics.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)