Who is Willard Van Orman Quine?

  • (noun): United States philosopher and logician who championed an empirical view of knowledge that depended on language (1908-2001).
    Synonyms: Quine, W. V. Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine

Willard Van Orman Quine (June 25, 1908 – December 25, 2000) (known to intimates as "Van") was an American philosopher and logician in the analytic tradition. From 1930 until his death 70 years later, Quine was continually affiliated with Harvard University in one way or another, first as a student, then as a professor of philosophy and a teacher of logic and set theory, and finally as a professor emeritus who published or revised several books in retirement. He filled the Edgar Pierce Chair of Philosophy at Harvard from 1956 to 1978. A recent poll conducted among analytic philosophers named Quine as the fifth most important philosopher of the past two centuries. He won the first Schock Prize in Logic and Philosophy in 1993, for "his systematical and penetrating discussions of how learning of language and communication are based on socially available evidence and of the consequences of this for theories on knowledge and linguistic meaning."

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Some articles on Willard Van Orman Quine:

De Dicto And de Re - Representing de Dicto and de Re in Modal Logic - Willard Van Orman Quine
... Willard Van Orman Quine refers to D ... Kaplan, who in turn credits Montgomery Furth for the term vivid designator in his paper Reference Modality ...
Duhem–Quine Thesis - Willard Van Orman Quine
... Quine, on the other hand, in "Two Dogmas of Empiricism", presents a much stronger version of underdetermination in science ... Hence all our knowledge, for Quine, would be epistemologically no different from ancient Greek gods, which were posited in order to account for ... Quine even believed that logic and mathematics can also be revised in light of experience, and presented quantum logic as evidence for this ...

Famous quotes containing the words van orman quine, willard van orman, willard van, orman quine, quine, orman, willard and/or van:

    To call a posit a posit is not to patronize it. A posit can be unavoidable except at the cost of other no less artificial expedients. Everything to which we concede existence is a posit from the standpoint of a description of the theory-building process, and simultaneously real from the standpoint of the theory that is being built.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    One man’s antinomy is another man’s falsidical paradox, give or take a couple of thousand years.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    A curious thing about the ontological problem is its simplicity. It can be put in three Anglo-Saxon monosyllables: ‘What is there?’ It can be answered, moveover, in a word—‘Everything.’
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Analyze theory-building how we will, we all must start in the middle. Our conceptual firsts are middle-sized, middle-distanced objects, and our introduction to them and to everything comes midway in the cultural evolution of the race.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    To call a posit a posit is not to patronize it. A posit can be unavoidable except at the cost of other no less artificial expedients. Everything to which we concede existence is a posit from the standpoint of a description of the theory-building process, and simultaneously real from the standpoint of the theory that is being built.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    We must not leap to the fatalistic conclusion that we are stuck with the conceptual scheme that we grew up in. We can change it, bit by bit, plank by plank, though meanwhile there is nothing to carry us along but the evolving conceptual scheme itself. The philosopher’s task was well compared by Neurath to that of a mariner who must rebuild his ship on the open sea.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Every woman who vacates a place in the teachers’ ranks and enters an unusual line of work, does two excellent things: she makes room for someone waiting for a place and helps to open a new vocation for herself and other women.
    —Frances E. Willard (1839–1898)

    The lore of our fathers is a fabric of sentences.... It is a pale gray lore, black with fact and white with convention. But I have found no substantial reasons for concluding that there are any quite black threads in it, or any white ones.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)