Who is Walter Lippmann?

  • (noun): United States journalist (1889-1974).
    Synonyms: Lippmann

Walter Lippmann

Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 – December 14, 1974) was an American public intellectual, writer, reporter, and political commentator famous for being among the first to introduce the concept of Cold War; he coined the term stereotype in the modern psychological meaning as well. Lippmann was twice awarded (1958 and 1962) a Pulitzer Prize for his syndicated newspaper column, "Today and Tomorrow".

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Colloque Walter Lippmann
... The Walter Lippman Colloquium, in French Colloque Walter Lippmann, was a conference of intellectuals organized in Paris in August 1938 by French philosopher Louis Rougier ... The colloquium was named after American journalist Walter Lippmann ... Participants included Walter Lippmann himself, German Ordoliberals such as Wilhelm Röpke and Alexander Rüstow, Austrian School theorists such as Friedrich Hayek and ...

Famous quotes containing the words walter lippmann, lippmann and/or walter:

    Where mass opinion dominates the government, there is a morbid derangement of the true functions of power. The derangement brings about the enfeeblement, verging on paralysis, of the capacity to govern. This breakdown in the constitutional order is the cause of the precipitate and catastrophic decline of Western society. It may, if it cannot be arrested and reversed, bring about the fall of the West.
    Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    Our conscience is not the vessel of eternal verities. It grows with our social life, and a new social condition means a radical change in conscience.
    —Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    Just at the stroke when my veins start and spread,
    Set on my soul an everlasting head.
    Then am I ready, like a palmer fit,
    To tread those blest paths which before I writ.
    —Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?–1618)