Who is Walter Lippmann?

  • (noun): United States journalist (1889-1974).
    Synonyms: Lippmann

Walter Lippmann

Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 – December 14, 1974) was an American public intellectual, writer, reporter, and political commentator famous for being among the first to introduce the concept of Cold War; he coined the term stereotype in the modern psychological meaning as well. Lippmann was twice awarded (1958 and 1962) a Pulitzer Prize for his syndicated newspaper column, "Today and Tomorrow".

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Colloque Walter Lippmann
... The Walter Lippman Colloquium, in French Colloque Walter Lippmann, was a conference of intellectuals organized in Paris in August 1938 by French philosopher Louis Rougier ... The colloquium was named after American journalist Walter Lippmann ... Participants included Walter Lippmann himself, German Ordoliberals such as Wilhelm Röpke and Alexander Rüstow, Austrian School theorists such as Friedrich Hayek and Ludwig von ...

Famous quotes containing the words walter lippmann, lippmann and/or walter:

    The principles of the good society call for a concern with an order of being—which cannot be proved existentially to the sense organs—where it matters supremely that the human person is inviolable, that reason shall regulate the will, that truth shall prevail over error.
    Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    When distant and unfamiliar and complex things are communicated to great masses of people, the truth suffers a considerable and often a radical distortion. The complex is made over into the simple, the hypothetical into the dogmatic, and the relative into an absolute.
    —Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    And they be these: the wood, the weed, the wag.
    The wood is that which makes the gallow tree;
    The weed is that which strings the hangman’s bag;
    —Sir Walter Raleigh (1552?–1618)