Who is Walter Lippmann?

  • (noun): United States journalist (1889-1974).
    Synonyms: Lippmann

Walter Lippmann

Walter Lippmann (September 23, 1889 – December 14, 1974) was an American public intellectual, writer, reporter, and political commentator famous for being among the first to introduce the concept of Cold War; he coined the term stereotype in the modern psychological meaning as well. Lippmann was twice awarded (1958 and 1962) a Pulitzer Prize for his syndicated newspaper column, "Today and Tomorrow".

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Colloque Walter Lippmann
... The Walter Lippman Colloquium, in French Colloque Walter Lippmann, was a conference of intellectuals organized in Paris in August 1938 by French philosopher Louis Rougier ... The colloquium was named after American journalist Walter Lippmann ... Participants included Walter Lippmann himself, German Ordoliberals such as Wilhelm Röpke and Alexander Rüstow, Austrian School theorists such as Friedrich Hayek and Ludwig ...

Famous quotes containing the words walter lippmann, lippmann and/or walter:

    The private citizen, beset by partisan appeals for the loan of his Public Opinion, will soon see, perhaps, that these appeals are not a compliment to his intelligence, but an imposition on his good nature and an insult to his sense of evidence.
    Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    No amount of charters, direct primaries, or short ballots will make a democracy out of an illiterate people.
    —Walter Lippmann (1889–1974)

    With the single exception of Homer, there is no eminent writer, not even Sir Walter Scott, whom I can despise so entirely as I despise Shakespear when I measure my mind against his.... But I am bound to add that I pity the man who cannot enjoy Shakespear. He has outlasted thousands of abler thinkers, and will outlast a thousand more.
    George Bernard Shaw (1856–1950)