Who is richard brooks?

Richard Brooks

Richard Brooks (May 18, 1912 – March 11, 1992) was an American screenwriter, film director, novelist and occasional film producer. His outstanding works as director are Blackboard Jungle (1955), Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), Elmer Gantry (1960) — for which he won an Academy Award for Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay) — In Cold Blood (1967) and Looking for Mr. Goodbar (1977).

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Golden Globe Award For Best Motion Picture – Drama - 1960s
... Stanley Kubrick Kirk Douglas Elmer Gantry * Richard Brooks Bernard Smith Inherit the Wind Stanley Kramer Stanley Kramer Sons and Lovers * Jack Cardiff Jerry Wald Sunrise at Campobello Vincent J ... Hill Sam Jaffe The Professionals Richard Brooks Richard Brooks The Sand Pebbles * Robert Wise Robert Wise Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? * Mike Nichols Ernest Lehman 1967 In the ...
Directors Guild Of America Award For Outstanding Directing – Feature Film - Winners and Nominees - 1960s
... 1960 Billy Wilder† – The Apartment Richard Brooks – Elmer Gantry Jack Cardiff – Sons and Lovers Vincent J ... Cat Ballou 1966 Fred Zinnemann† – A Man for All Seasons Richard Brooks – The Professionals John Frankenheimer – Grand Prix Lewis Gilbert – Alfie James Hill – Born Free Norman Jewison – The Russians Are ...
Academy Award For Best Writing (Adapted Screenplay) - Winners and Nominees - 1960s
... Year Film Screenwriter(s) Adapted from 1960 (33rd) Elmer Gantry Richard Brooks The novel Elmer Gantry by Sinclair Lewis Inherit the Wind Nedrick Young (front Nathan E ... Richard L ... Alfie Bill Naughton The play Alfie by Bill Naughton The Professionals Richard Brooks The novel A Mule for the Marquesa by Frank O'Rourke The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming William ...

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