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Pearl S. Buck

Pearl Sydenstricker Buck (June 26, 1892 – March 6, 1973), also known by her Chinese name Sai Zhenzhu (Chinese: 賽珍珠; pinyin: Sài Zhēnzhū), was an American writer who spent most of her time until 1934 in China. Her novel The Good Earth was the best-selling fiction book in the U.S. in 1931 and 1932, and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1932. In 1938, she was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, "for her rich and truly epic descriptions of peasant life in China and for her biographical masterpieces."

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Pearl S. Buck - Further Reading
... Pearl S ... Buck A Cultural Biography ... ISBN 0521560802 Hilary Spurling, Burying the Bones Pearl Buck in China (London Profile, 2010) ISBN 9781861978288 Nora B ...

Famous quotes by pearl s. buck:

    ... in any war a victory means another war, and yet another, until some day inevitably the tides turn, and the victor is the vanquished, and the circle reverses itself, but remains nevertheless a circle.
    Pearl S. Buck (1892–1973)

    Euthanasia is a long, smooth-sounding word, and it conceals its danger as long, smooth words do, but the danger is there, nevertheless.
    Pearl S. Buck (1892–1973)

    Chinese were born ... with an accumulated wisdom, a natural sophistication, an intelligent naivete, and unless they were transplanted too young, these qualities ripened in them.... If ever I am homesick for China, now that I am home in my own country, it is when I discover here no philosophy. Our people have opinions and creeds and prejudices and ideas but as yet no philosophy.
    Pearl S. Buck (1892–1973)

    A man is educated and turned out to work. But a woman is educated—and turned out to grass.
    Pearl S. Buck (1892–1973)

    I learned early to understand that there is no such condition in human affairs as absolute truth. There is only truth as people see it, and truth, even in fact, may be kaleidoscopic in its variety. The damage such perception did to me I have felt ever since ... I could never belong entirely to one side of any question.
    Pearl S. Buck (1892–1973)