Who is Matthew Arnold?

  • (noun): English poet and literary critic (1822-1888).
    Synonyms: Arnold

Matthew Arnold

Matthew Arnold (24 December 1822 – 15 April 1888) was a British poet and cultural critic who worked as an inspector of schools. He was the son of Thomas Arnold, the famed headmaster of Rugby School, and brother to both Tom Arnold, literary professor, and William Delafield Arnold, novelist and colonial administrator. Matthew Arnold has been characterized as a sage writer, a type of writer who chastises and instructs the reader on contemporary social issues.

Read more about Matthew Arnold.

Some articles on Matthew Arnold:

Matthew Arnold - Prose - Religious Criticism
... Scholars of Arnold's works disagree on the nature of Arnold's personal religious beliefs ... Thomas Arnold, he rejected the supernatural elements in religion, even while retaining a fascination for church rituals ... Arnold seems to belong to a pragmatic middle ground that is more concerned with the poetry of religion and its virtues and values for society than with the existence of God ...
Matthew Arnold (disambiguation)
... Matthew Arnold (1822-1888) was a poet and cultural critic ... Matthew Arnold may also refer to Matthew Arnold School (Oxford), a secondary coeducational school in Oxford Matthew Arnold School (Staines), a secondary ...

Famous quotes containing the words matthew arnold, arnold and/or matthew:

    Light half-believers of our casual creeds,
    Who never deeply felt, nor clearly will’d,
    Whose insight never has borne fruit in deeds,
    Whose vague resolves never have been fulfill’d.
    Matthew Arnold (1822–1888)

    Who ordered, that their longing’s fire
    Should be, as soon as kindled, cooled?
    Who renders vain their deep desire?—
    A God, a God their severance ruled!
    And bade betwixt their shores to be
    The unplumbed, salt, estranging sea.
    —Matthew Arnold (1822–1888)

    ...you are like whitewashed tombs, which on the outside look beautiful, but inside they are full of the bones of the dead and of all kinds of filth.
    Bible: New Testament, Matthew 23:27.