Who is martin bormann?

Martin Bormann

Martin Bormann (17 June 1900 – 2 May 1945) was a prominent Nazi official. He became head of the Party Chancellery (Parteikanzlei) and private secretary to Adolf Hitler. He was almost always at his Führer′s side. Hitler typically did not issue written orders, but gave them verbally at meetings or in phone conversations; he also had Bormann convey orders. He gained Hitler's trust and derived immense power within the Third Reich by using his position to control the flow of information and access to Hitler. Bormann earned many enemies, including Heinrich Himmler.

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Martin Bormann - Death, Rumours of Survival and Discovery of Remains - Discovery of Remains and Controversy Surrounding Identification
... The hunt for Bormann lasted 26 years without success ... International investigators and journalists searched for Bormann from Paraguay to Moscow and from Norway to Egypt ... and mass graves dating from the last days of the war." On the political end, the hunt for Bormann became a recurring memory of the Nazi regime and also an embarrassment that would not go away ...
Hitler's Table Talk
... by Heinrich Heim, Henry Picker, and Martin Bormann, and later published by different editors, under different titles, in three different languages ... Martin Bormann, who was serving as Hitler's private secretary, persuaded Hitler to allow a team of specially picked officers to record in shorthand his private conversations for posterity ... Picker took notes from 21 March 1942 until 2 August 1942, after which Heinrich Heim and Martin Bormann continued appending material off and on until ...

Famous quotes containing the words bormann and/or martin:

    Everything I do is done within sight of the Führer, so that my faults or mistakes are never hidden from him. I do my very utmost to live and act in such a manner that the Führer should remain satisfied with me; I am hard-working; but whether I shall always be able to cope with the tasks entrusted to me in the future as well, is an open question.
    —Martin Bormann (1900–1945)

    She’s out there in the john, trying to get her knees unwelded.
    Robert Getchell, U.S. screenwriter, and Martin Scorsese. Flo (Diane Ladd)