Who is katharine fullerton gerould?

Katharine Fullerton Gerould

Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879-1944) was an American writer, born in Brockton, Massachusetts, and educated at Radcliffe College.

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Katharine Fullerton Gerould
... Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879-1944) was an American writer, born in Brockton, Massachusetts, and educated at Radcliffe College ... Gerould was criticized as weighing down a distinct literary talent with an unbending conservatism, which though it did not attract the masses, had a coterie of faithful admirers ...

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    Science has done great things for us; it has also pushed us hopelessly back. For, not content with filling its own place, it has tried to supersede everything else. It has challenged the super-eminence of religion; it has turned all philosophy out of doors except that which clings to its skirts; it has thrown contempt on all learning that does not depend on it; and it has bribed the skeptics by giving us immense material comforts.
    Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    ... if a person is to be unconventional, he must be amusing or he is intolerable: for, in the nature of the case, he guarantees you nothing but amusement. He does not guarantee you any of the little amenities by which society has assured itself that, if it must go to sleep, it will at least sleep in a comfortable chair.
    Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    Educational ... legislation nowadays is largely in the hands of illiterate people, and the illiterate will take good care that their illiteracy is not made a reproach on them.
    —Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    ... no gentleman lies, on any occasion, with unmixed pleasure. He feels, rather, as if he had put on rags.
    —Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    Each man’s private conscience ought to be a nice little self-registering thermometer: he ought to carry his moral code incorruptibly and explicitly within himself, and not care what the world thinks. The mass of human beings, however, are not made that way; and many people have been saved from crime or sin by the simple dislike of doing things they would not like to confess ...
    —Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)