Who is katharine fullerton gerould?

Katharine Fullerton Gerould

Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879-1944) was an American writer, born in Brockton, Massachusetts, and educated at Radcliffe College.

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Katharine Fullerton Gerould
... Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879-1944) was an American writer, born in Brockton, Massachusetts, and educated at Radcliffe College ... Gerould was criticized as weighing down a distinct literary talent with an unbending conservatism, which though it did not attract the masses, had a coterie of faithful admirers ...

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    ... if we have a dollar to spend on some wild excess, we shall spend it on a book, not on asparagus out of season.
    Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    No convention gets to be a convention at all except by grace of a lot of clever and powerful people first inventing it, and then imposing it on others. You can be pretty sure, if you are strictly conventional, that you are following genius—a long way off. And unless you are a genius yourself, that is a good thing to do.
    Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    At no time in history ... have the people who are not fit for society had such a glorious opportunity to pretend that society is not fit for them. Knowledge of the slums is at present a passport to society—so much the parlor philanthropists have achieved—and all they have to do is to prove that they know their subject. It is an odd qualification to have pitched on; but gentlemen and ladies are always credulous, especially if you tell them that they are not doing their duty.
    —Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    ... when you make it a moral necessity for the young to dabble in all the subjects that the books on the top shelf are written about, you kill two very large birds with one stone: you satisfy precious curiosities, and you make them believe that they know as much about life as people who really know something. If college boys are solemnly advised to listen to lectures on prostitution, they will listen; and who is to blame if some time, in a less moral moment, they profit by their information?
    —Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)

    Each man’s private conscience ought to be a nice little self-registering thermometer: he ought to carry his moral code incorruptibly and explicitly within himself, and not care what the world thinks. The mass of human beings, however, are not made that way; and many people have been saved from crime or sin by the simple dislike of doing things they would not like to confess ...
    —Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)