Who is James Boswell?

  • (noun): Scottish author noted for his biography of Samuel Johnson (1740-1795).
    Synonyms: Boswell

James Boswell

James Boswell, 9th Laird of Auchinleck (29 October 1740 – 19 May 1795) was a lawyer, diarist, and author born in Edinburgh, Scotland. He is best known for the biography he wrote of one of his contemporaries, the English literary figure Samuel Johnson, which the modern Johnsonian critic Harold Bloom has claimed is the greatest biography written in the English language.

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Some articles on James Boswell:

Ayton, Scottish Borders - James Boswell
... The Scottish diarist and author James Boswell, biographer of Samuel Johnson passed through Ayton on his journey to London on 15 November 1762 ...
Boswell (surname)
... Boswell is a Scottish family name and may refer to the following individuals Alexander Boswell (1706 – 1782), judge of the Scottish supreme court and father of James Boswell Sir Alexander. 1817 – 1909), Cornish Gipsy James Boswell (1740 – 1795), Scottish lawyer, diarist, author, and biographer of Samuel Johnson James Griffin Boswell (1882 – 1952 ...
King Of The Gypsies - England - Boswells - James Boswell
... the two ends of which are now remaining, where was interred the body of James Bosvill the King of the Gypsies, who died January 30, 1708 ... A legend says that Boswell lived in Sherwood Forest helping travellers and Gypsies ... A tradition was reported of annual visits to the grave of Charles Boswell near Doncaster for more than 100 years into the 1820s, including a rite of ...
James Boswell - Published Journals
... Boswell's London Journal, 1762-1763 Boswell in Holland, 1763-1764, including his correspondence with Belle de Zuylen (ZeÌlide) Boswell on the Grand Tour Germany and Switzerland, 1764 Boswell on the Grand Tour ...

Famous quotes containing the words james boswell, boswell and/or james:

    To abolish a status, which in all ages God has sanctioned, and man has continued, would not only be robbery to an innumerable class of our fellow-subjects; but it would be extreme cruelty to the African Savages, a portion of whom it saves from massacre, or intolerable bondage in their own country, and introduces into a much happier state of life; especially now when their passage to the West-Indies and their treatment there is humanely regulated.
    James Boswell (1740–1795)

    I was not at all shocked with this execution at the time. John died seemingly without much pain. He was effectually hanged, the rope having fixed upon his neck very firmly, and he was allowed to hang near three quarters of an hour; so that any attempt to recover him would have been in vain. I comforted myself in thinking that by giving up the scheme I had avoided much anxiety and uneasiness.
    —James Boswell (1740–1795)

    How sick one gets of being “good,” how much I should respect myself if I could burst out and make everyone wretched for twenty-four hours; embody selfishness.
    —Alice James (1848–1892)