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Some articles on flannery:

Conflict Of Interest (film) - Cast
... Christopher McDonald as Mickey Flannery Judd Nelson as Charles "Gideon" Morningside Alyssa Milano as Eve Zia Harris as Jason Flannery Lee de Broux as Ray Dureen ...
Tony Flannery
... Tony Flannery (born c ... A Redemptorist, Flannery is a native of Attymon, Athenry in County Galway, Ireland ... Flannery is the founder of the Irish Association of Catholic Priests ...
Constance O'Day-Flannery - Biography
... Constance O'Day-Flannery has never taken a writing course or attended college ... While reading romance novels during her recovery from a hysterectomy, O'Day-Flannery began to think about the type of book she would want to read ... In 2001, O'Day-Flannery took a hiatus from writing ...
Anti-Flannery
... "Anti-Flannery" is a variation used in systems which use canapé approach, where shorter suit is opened first ... The further development is similar to the basic Flannery ...
Tim Flannery (baseball) - San Diego Padres - Fan Favorite
... Though never a star, Flannery was a fan favorite in San Diego for much of his career ... Team organist Danny Topaz would greet Flannery's plate appearances with the imposing strains of Wagner's Ride of the Valkyries ... on at least one call-in show of whether Flannery's number should be retired ...

Famous quotes containing the words flannery o:

    Whenever I’m asked why Southern writers particularly have a penchant for writing about freaks, I say it is because we are still able to recognize one. To be able to recognize a freak, you have to have some conception of the whole man, and in the South the general conception of man is still, in the main, theological.
    Flannery O’Connor (1925–1964)

    The problem of the novelist who wishes to write about a man’s encounter with God is how he shall make the experience—which is both natural and supernatural—understandable, and credible, to his reader. In any age this would be a problem, but in our own, it is a well- nigh insurmountable one. Today’s audience is one in which religious feeling has become, if not atrophied, at least vaporous and sentimental.
    Flannery O’Connor (1925–1964)