Who is ellen henrietta swallow richards?

Famous quotes containing the words henrietta swallow richards, ellen henrietta swallow, ellen henrietta, swallow richards, richards, swallow, ellen and/or henrietta:

    There are women in middle life, whose days are crowded with practical duties, physical strain, and moral responsibility ... they fail to see that some use of the mind, in solid reading or in study, would refresh them by its contrast with carking cares, and would prepare interest and pleasure for their later years. Such women often sink into depression, as their cares fall away from them, and many even become insane. They are mentally starved to death.
    —Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    Subject the material world to the higher ends by understanding it in all its relations to daily life and action.
    Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    If it is a relief to take your clothes off at night, be sure that something is wrong. Clothes should not be a burden. They should be a comfort and a protection.
    Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    The well-educated young woman of 1950 will blend art and sciences in a way we do not dream of; the science will steady the art and the art will give charm to the science. This young woman will marry—yes, indeed, but she will take her pick of men, who will by that time have begun to realize what sort of men it behooves them to be.
    —Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    ...some sort of false logic has crept into our schools, for the people whom I have seen doing housework or cooking know nothing of botany or chemistry, and the people who know botany and chemistry do not cook or sweep. The conclusion seems to be, if one knows chemistry she must not cook or do housework.
    —Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    Now I stand as one upon a rock,
    Environed with a wilderness of sea,
    Who marks the waxing tide grow wave by wave,
    Expecting ever when some envious surge
    Will in his brinish bowels swallow him.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    The cultivation of one set of faculties tends to the disuse of others. The loss of one faculty sharpens others; the blind are sensitive in touch. Has not the extreme cultivation of the commercial faculty permitted others as essential to national life, to be blighted by disease?
    —J. Ellen Foster (1840–1910)

    One of the greatest faults of the women of the present time is a silly fear of things, and one object of the education of girls should be to give them knowledge of what things are really dangerous.
    —Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)