Who is elizabeth stuart phelps?

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Elizabeth Stuart Phelps Ward - Biography
... Elizabeth was born at Andover, Massachusetts to Austin Phelps and Elizabeth Stuart Phelps ... In most of her writings she used her mother's name "Elizabeth Stuart Phelps" as a pseudonym, both before and after her marriage in 1888 to Herbert Dickinson Ward, a journalist seventeen years younger ... Her father Austin Phelps was pastor of the Pine Street Congregational Church until 1848, when he accepted a position as the Chair of Rhetoric at Andover ...

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    ... we, like so many others who think more of working than of dying, care only to push on steadily, wishing less for cessation of toil than for strength to keep at it; and for wisdom to make it worthy of the ideal of labor and of life which we believe to be the most precious gift of Heaven to any soul.
    Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844–1911)

    It is not in our drawing-rooms that we should look to judge of the intrinsic worth of any style of dress. The street-car is a truer crucible of its inherent value.
    Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844–1911)

    I believe in women; and in their right to their own best possibilities in every department of life. I believe that the methods of dress practiced among women are a marked hindrance to the realization of these possibilities, and should be scorned or persuaded out of society.
    —Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844–1911)

    The literary artist will ... portray what he knows, and little else. Imagination is built upon knowledge, and his dreams will rest upon his facts. He is worth to the world just about what he has learned from it, and no more.
    —Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844–1911)

    I believe in women; and in their right to their own best possibilities in every department of life. I believe that the methods of dress practiced among women are a marked hindrance to the realization of these possibilities, and should be scorned or persuaded out of society.
    —Elizabeth Stuart Phelps (1844–1911)