Who is Edith Wharton?

Edith Wharton

Edith Wharton (/ ˈiːdɪθ ˈwɔːrtən/; born Edith Newbold Jones, January 24, 1862 – August 11, 1937) was a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist, short story writer, and designer.

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Some articles on Edith Wharton:

The Mount (Lenox, Massachusetts) - History
... Edith Wharton used the principles described in her first book, The Decoration of Houses (co-authored with Ogden Codman, Jr.), when she designed the house ... Wharton's sometime collaborator Ogden Codman, Jr ... Wharton's niece, Beatrix Jones Farrand, designed the kitchen garden and the drive Farrand was the only woman of the eleven founders of the American Society of Landscape ...
Rhinecliff, New York
... According to Louis Auchincloss, Edith Wharton's biographer, Mrs ... Edith Wharton was a frequent childhood visitor who later described Wyndclyffe as "The Willows" in Hudson River Bracketed.* In her autobiography, A Backward Glance (1933), Mrs ... Wharton wrote about Wyndcliffe and her aunt ...
Howard Sturgis - Biography
... He became a friend of the novelists Henry James and Edith Wharton ... Although Edith Wharton praised it, Henry James found it unsatisfactory, and afterwards Sturgis went on to publish only one short story (1908), about a lesser writer driven suicidal by the ... Benson (1924), Edith Wharton (1934), E ...
Edith Wharton - In Popular Culture
... In The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles, Edith Wharton (Clare Higgins) travels across North Africa with Indiana Jones in Chapter 16, Tales of Innocence ... Edith Wharton is mentioned in the HBO television series Entourage in the third season's 13th episode Vince is handed a screenplay for Wharton's The Glimpses of the ... In the same episode, period films of Wharton's work are lampooned by agent Ari Gold, who says that all her stories are "about a guy who likes a girl, but he can't have sex with her for five ...

Famous quotes containing the words edith wharton, wharton and/or edith:

    Almost everybody in the neighborhood had “troubles,” frankly localized and specified; but only the chosen had “complications.” To have them was in itself a distinction, though it was also, in most cases, a death warrant. People struggled on for years with “troubles,” but they almost always succumbed to “complications.”
    Edith Wharton (1862–1937)

    When people ask for time, it’s always for time to say no. Yes has one more letter in it, but it doesn’t take half as long to say.
    —Edith Wharton (1862–1937)

    I know that if I’d had to go and take an exam for acting, I wouldn’t have got anywhere. You don’t take exams for acting, you take your courage.
    —Dame Edith Evans (1888–1976)