Who is Edgar Lee Masters?

  • (noun): United States poet (1869-1950).
    Synonyms: Masters

Edgar Lee Masters

Edgar Lee Masters (August 23, 1868 – March 5, 1950) was an American poet, biographer, and dramatist. He is the author of Spoon River Anthology, The New Star Chamber and Other Essays, Songs and Satires, The Great Valley, The Serpent in the Wilderness An Obscure Tale, The Spleen, Mark Twain: A Portrait, Lincoln: The Man, and Illinois Poems. In all, Masters published twelve plays, twenty-one books of poetry, six novels and six biographies, including those of Abraham Lincoln, Mark Twain, Vachel Lindsay, and Walt Whitman.

Read more about Edgar Lee Masters.

Famous quotes containing the words edgar lee, lee masters, masters and/or lee:

    Where are Elmer, Herman, Bert, Tom and Charley,
    The weak of will, the strong of arm, the clown, the boozer, the
    fighter?
    All, all, are sleeping on the hill.
    Edgar Lee Masters (1869–1950)

    To be able to see every side of every question;
    To be on every side, to be everything, to be nothing long;
    To pervert truth, to ride it for a purpose,

    To use great feelings and passions of the human family
    For base designs, for cunning ends;
    —Edgar Lee Masters (1869–1950)

    Economy, prudence, and a simple life are the sure masters of need, and will often accomplish that which, their opposites, with a fortune at hand, will fail to do.
    Clara Barton (1821–1912)

    As you grow older, you’ll see white men cheat black men every day of your life, but let me tell you something and don’t you forget it—whenever a white man does that to a black man, no matter who he is, how rich he is, or how fine a family he comes from, that white man is trash.
    —Harper Lee (b. 1926)