Who is Charles Baudelaire?

Charles Baudelaire

Charles Pierre Baudelaire (; April 9, 1821 – August 31, 1867) was a French poet who produced notable work as an essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe. His most famous work, Les Fleurs du mal (The Flowers of Evil), expresses the changing nature of beauty in modern, industrializing Paris during the 19th century. Baudelaire's highly original style of prose-poetry influenced a whole generation of poets including Paul Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud and Stéphane Mallarmé among many others. He is credited with coining the term "modernity" (modernité) to designate the fleeting, ephemeral experience of life in an urban metropolis, and the responsibility art has to capture that experience.

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Some articles on Charles Baudelaire:

A Series Of Unfortunate Events - Setting - Allusions
... to adults, such as references to Monty Python apparent in the series (the Baudelaire children's uncle Monty has a large snake collection, including a python, allusions to the Self Defense ... For example, the Baudelaire orphans are named after Charles Baudelaire, and Sunny and Klaus take their first names from Claus and Sunny von Bülow, while Mr ... sons, Edgar and Albert, a reference to Edgar Albert Guest.) Strangely, Charles Baudelaire met Edgar Allan Poe, and many of Poe's loved ones had died from tuberculosis, a disease ...
Spells And Philtres - Contents
... Drama'" (from Clérigo Herrero) "Rimas XXXIII" (from Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer) "Ecclesiastes" (from Charles-Marie-René Leconte de Lisle) "Anterior Life" (from Charles Baudelaire) "Song ...
Charles Baudelaire - Works - Discography
... French composer Claude Debussy set five poems from Baudelaire into music in 1890 Le Balcon, Harmonie du soir, Le Jet d'eau, Recueillement and La mort des amants ... Du Mal", is a compilation of songs from Baudelaire's book of the same name ...

Famous quotes containing the words charles baudelaire and/or baudelaire:

    As a small child, I felt in my heart two contradictory feelings, the horror of life and the ecstasy of life.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821–1867)

    All fashions are charming, or rather relatively charming, each one being a new striving, more or less well conceived, after beauty, an approximate statement of an ideal, the desire for which constantly teases the unsatisfied human mind.
    —Charles Baudelaire (1821–1867)