Who is c. wright mills?

C. Wright Mills

Charles Wright Mills (August 28, 1916 – March 20, 1962) was an American sociologist, and a professor of sociology at Columbia University from 1946 until his death in 1962. Mills was published widely in popular and intellectual journals, and is remembered for several books. Among them The Power Elite, which introduced that term and describes the relationships and class alliances among the U.S. political, military, and economic elites, White Collar, on the American middle class, and The Sociological Imagination, where Mills proposes the proper relationship in sociological scholarship between biography and history.

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Some articles on c. wright mills:

Elite Theory - Elite Theorists - C. Wright Mills
... Mills published his book The Power Elite in 1956, claiming a new sociological perspective on systems of power in the United States ... Mills proposed that this group had been generated through a process of rationalization at work in all advanced industrial societies whereby the mechanisms of power became concentrated ...
C. Wright Mills - Awards
... Wright Mills Award in 1964 for the book that "best exemplifies outstanding social science research and a great understanding the individual and society in the tradition of the distinguished sociologist, C ... Wright Mills." The criteria are for the book that most effectively critically address an issue of contemporary public importance, bring to the topic a fresh, imaginative perspective, advance social scientific ...

Famous quotes containing the words wright mills, mills and/or wright:

    America is a nation with no truly national city, no Paris, no Rome, no London, no city which is at once the social center, the political capital, and the financial hub.
    —C. Wright Mills (1916–1962)

    Commercial jazz, soap opera, pulp fiction, comic strips, the movies set the images, mannerisms, standards, and aims of the urban masses. In one way or another, everyone is equal before these cultural machines; like technology itself, the mass media are nearly universal in their incidence and appeal. They are a kind of common denominator, a kind of scheme for pre-scheduled, mass emotions.
    —C. Wright Mills (1916–62)

    America is a nation with no truly national city, no Paris, no Rome, no London, no city which is at once the social center, the political capital, and the financial hub.
    —C. Wright Mills (1916–1962)