Who is c. wright mills?

C. Wright Mills

Charles Wright Mills (August 28, 1916 – March 20, 1962) was an American sociologist, and a professor of sociology at Columbia University from 1946 until his death in 1962. Mills was published widely in popular and intellectual journals, and is remembered for several books. Among them The Power Elite, which introduced that term and describes the relationships and class alliances among the U.S. political, military, and economic elites, White Collar, on the American middle class, and The Sociological Imagination, where Mills proposes the proper relationship in sociological scholarship between biography and history.

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Some articles on c. wright mills:

Elite Theory - Elite Theorists - C. Wright Mills
... Mills published his book The Power Elite in 1956, claiming a new sociological perspective on systems of power in the United States ... Mills proposed that this group had been generated through a process of rationalization at work in all advanced industrial societies whereby the mechanisms of power became ...
C. Wright Mills - Awards
... Wright Mills Award in 1964 for the book that "best exemplifies outstanding social science research and a great understanding the individual and society in the ... Wright Mills." The criteria are for the book that most effectively critically address an issue of contemporary public importance, bring to the topic a fresh, imaginative perspective ...

Famous quotes containing the words mills and/or wright:

    By the power elite, we refer to those political, economic, and military circles which as an intricate set of overlapping cliques share decisions having at least national consequences. In so far as national events are decided, the power elite are those who decide them.
    —C. Wright Mills (1916–1962)

    It is in vain that we would circumscribe the power of one half of our race, and that half by far the most important and influential. If they exert it not for good, they will for evil; if they advance not knowledge, they will perpetuate ignorance. Let women stand where they may in the scale of improvement, their position decides that of the race.
    —Frances Wright (1795–1852)