Who is Benjamin Disraeli?

  • (noun): British statesman who as Prime Minister bought controlling interest in the Suez Canal and made Queen Victoria the empress of India (1804-1881).
    Synonyms: Disraeli, First Earl of Beaconsfield

Benjamin Disraeli

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG, PC, FRS, (21 December 1804 – 19 April 1881) was a British Prime Minister, parliamentarian, Conservative statesman and literary figure. He served in government in four decades, twice as Prime Minister of Great Britain. He played a central role in the creation of the modern Conservative Party after the Corn Laws schism of 1846.

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Some articles on Benjamin Disraeli:

Leader Of The House Of Commons - Leaders of The House of Commons Since 1721 - 19th Century
30 June 21 ... February 1852 Prime Minister Whig Himself Benjamin Disraeli 27 February 17 ... December 1852 Chancellor of the Exchequer Conservative The Earl of Derby Lord John Russell 28 December 30 ... January ...
Politics In Fiction - Written Works
1842) by Alessandro Manzoni Coningsby (1844) by Benjamin Disraeli Sybil, or The Two Nations (1845) by Benjamin Disraeli Tancred (1847) by Benjamin Disraeli Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) by ...
Leader Of The Opposition (United Kingdom) - List of Leaders of The Opposition
... of Granby 4 March 1848 vacant February 1849 Marquess of Granby John Charles Herries and Benjamin Disraeli 1851 ... Benjamin Disraeli 2 February 1852 Whig ...
Political Fiction - Notable Examples
1842) by Alessandro Manzoni Coningsby (novel) (1844) by Benjamin Disraeli Sybil, or The Two Nations (1845) by Benjamin Disraeli Tancred (1847) by Benjamin Disraeli Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) by ...

Famous quotes containing the words benjamin disraeli, disraeli and/or benjamin:

    That doctrine [of peace at any price] has done more mischief than any I can well recall that have been afloat in this country. It has occasioned more wars than any of the most ruthless conquerors. It has disturbed and nearly destroyed that political equilibrium so necessary to the liberties and the welfare of the world.
    Benjamin Disraeli (1804–1881)

    Consider Ireland.... You have a starving population, an absentee aristocracy, and an alien Church, and in addition the weakest executive in the world. That is the Irish Question.
    —Benjamin Disraeli (1804–1881)

    Where there are no rights, there are no duties. To tell the truth is thus a duty; but it is a duty only in respect to one who has a right to the truth.
    —Henri Benjamin Constant De Rebecque (1767–1830)