Who is Ben Jonson?

  • (noun): English dramatist and poet who was the first real poet laureate of England (1572-1637).
    Synonyms: Jonson, Benjamin Jonson

Ben Jonson

Benjamin "Ben" Jonson (c. 11 June 1572 – 6 August 1637) was an English Renaissance dramatist, poet and actor. A contemporary of William Shakespeare, he is best known for his satirical plays, particularly Volpone, The Alchemist, and Bartholomew Fair, which are considered his best, and his lyric poems. A man of vast reading and a seemingly insatiable appetite for controversy, Jonson had an unparalleled breadth of influence on Jacobean and Caroline playwrights and poets.

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Some articles on Ben Jonson:

16th Century In Literature - New Drama
... Anonymous (published) 1597 The Isle of Dogs - Thomas Nashe Ben Jonson Richard II - William Shakespeare (published) 1598 Robert Greene - The Scottish Historie ...
Robert Johnson (English Composer) - Works/discography - Music Connected With Ben Jonson's Plays
... "Have you seen the bright lily grow?" from Ben Jonson's comedy The Devil is an Ass, 1616 ... Oberon, the Faery Prince, masque written by Ben Jonson (performed in 1611) ...
Biographies of Ben Jonson
... Ben Jonson His Life and Work by Rosalind Miles Ben Jonson His Craft and Art by Rosalind Miles Ben Jonson A Literary Life by W ... David Kay Ben Jonson A Life by David Riggs (1989) Ben Jonson A Life by Ian Donaldson (2011) ...
Thomas Thorpe - Notable Published Works
... Lucan by Christopher Marlowe 1605- All Fools by George Chapman 1605- Sejanus by Ben Jonson 1606- The Gentleman Usher by George Chapman 1606- Hymenaei by Ben Jonson ...
City Comedy
... in particular, some of the comedies of Ben Jonson (Volpone, Epicoene), Thomas Middleton (A Trick to Catch the Old One, A Chaste Maid in Cheapside) and John Marston (The Dutch Courtesan') ... Among the earliest City Comedies are Ben Jonson's "Every Man Out of His Humour" and Thomas Dekker's "The Shoemaker's Holiday," both dating from 1598 ... by plays which were set in a recognizable contemporary London, and which dealt with, in Ben Jonson's words, "deeds and language such as men do use" (Prologue to Every Man in his Humour) ...

Famous quotes containing the words ben jonson, jonson and/or ben:

    Thou art a monument without a tomb,
    And art alive still while thy book doth live
    And we have wits to read and praise to give.
    Ben Jonson (1572–1637)

    Poetry, and Picture, are Arts of a like nature; and both are busie about imitation. It was excellently said of Plutarch, Poetry was a speaking Picture, and Picture a mute Poesie. For they both invent, faine, and devise many things, and accommodate all they invent to the use, and service of nature. Yet of the two, the Pen is more noble, than the Pencill. For that can speake to the Understanding; the other, but to the Sense.
    —Ben Jonson (1573–1637)

    For of fortunes sharp adversitee
    The worst kynde of infortune is this,
    A man to han ben in prosperitee,
    And it remembren, whan it passed is.
    Geoffrey Chaucer (1340–1400)