Who is Baruch?

Baruch

Baruch (Hebrew: בָּרוּךְ, Barukh Bārûḵ ; "Blessed") has been a given name among Jews from Biblical times up to the present, on some occasions also used as surname. It is also found, though more rarely, among Christians—particularly among Protestants who use Old Testament names.

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Some articles on Baruch:

List Of His Dark Materials Characters - Other Characters - Baruch
... Baruch and his same-sex partner, Balthamos, are both angels in rebellion from the Kingdom of Heaven ... Baruch's courageous and dedicated nature leads to a fight with the Regent ... wounded and separated from Balthamos and Will, Baruch brings himself to Lord Asriel ...
List Of His Dark Materials Characters - Other Characters - Balthamos
... Balthamos and his same-sex partner, Baruch, are both angels in rebellion from the Kingdom of Heaven ... This decision proves to be dangerous both Baruch and Balthamos are aware the Regent is after them, especially now that they are being accompanied by Will ... An unfortunate encounter leads to Baruch being fatally wounded ...
Adam Baruch
... Baruch Meir Rosenblum (9 April 1945 – 24 May 2008), better known by the pen name Adam Baruch, was an Israeli journalist, newspaper editor, writer and ...
Baruch - Other
... Baruch College, part of the City University of New York, named after Bernard Baruch ... Baruch Plan, a proposed U.S ... atomic energy plan following WWII by Bernard Baruch ...
Adam Baruch - External References
... Essayist, artist Adam Baruch dies at 63, Ynetnews ... Critic and journalist Adam Baruch passes away at age 63, Haaretz web site ...

More definitions of "Baruch":

  • (noun): An Apocryphal book ascribed to Baruch.
    Synonyms: Book of Baruch
  • (noun): A disciple of and secretary for the prophet Jeremiah.

Famous quotes containing the word baruch:

    The working woman may be quick to see any problems with children as her fault because she isn’t as available to them. However, the fact that she is employed is rarely central to the conflict. And overall, studies show, being employed doesn’t have negative effects on children; carefully done research consistently makes this clear.
    —Grace Baruch (20th century)

    The myth of motherhood as martyrdom has been bred into women, and behavioral scientists have helped embellish the myth with their ideas of correct “feminine” behavior. If women understand that they do not have to ignore their own needs and desires when they become mothers, that to be self-interested is not to be selfish, it will help them to avoid the trap of overattachment.
    —Grace Baruch (20th century)

    The mother whose self-image is dependent on her children places on those children the responsibility for her own identity, and her involvement in the details of their lives can put great pressure on the children. A child suffers when everything he or she does is extremely important to a parent; this kind of over-involvement can turn even a small problem into a crisis.
    —Grace Baruch (20th century)