Who is Althea Gibson?

  • (noun): United States tennis player who was the first Black woman player to win all the major world singles titles (born in 1927).
    Synonyms: Gibson

Althea Gibson

Althea Gibson (August 25, 1927 – September 28, 2003) was a champion tennis competitor and the first African-American woman to be on the world tennis tour, as well as the first to win a Grand Slam title (in 1956). She was a World No. 1 and is sometimes referred to as "the Jackie Robinson of tennis" for breaking the color barrier. Gibson was a member of Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority.

Read more about Althea Gibson.

Some articles on Althea Gibson:

Althea Gibson - Grand Slam Singles Tournament Timeline
... SR = the ratio of the number of Grand Slam singles tournaments won to the number of those tournaments played. ...
Winifred Mc Nair - Grand Slam Singles Final - Runner-up (1)
... Anne Shilcock (1956) Angela Buxton / Althea Gibson (1957) Althea Gibson / Darlene Hard (1958) Maria Bueno / Althea Gibson (1959) Jeanne Arth / Darlene Hard (1960) Maria Bueno / Darlene Hard (1961) Karen Hantze ...
1956 French Championships – Women's Singles - Draw - Finals
1 5 ... Zsuzsi Kormoczy 1 ... Angela Mortimer 3 ... Althea Gibson 6 ... Shirley Bloomer 3 ... Althea Gibson 3 ... Althea Gibson 15 ... Angela Buxton 10 ... Edda Buding 15 ... Angela Buxton 6. ...
List Of Wimbledon Mixed Doubles Champions - Finalists
1956 Vic Seixas Shirley Fry Irvin Gardnar Mulloy Althea Gibson 2–6, 6–2, 7–5 1957 Mervyn Rose Darlene Hard Neale Fraser Althea Gibson 6–4, 7–5 1958 Bob Howe Lorraine Coghlan Robinson Kurt Nielsen ...
1958 Wimbledon Championships – Women's Singles - Draw - Finals
... Quarterfinals Semifinals Finals 1 Althea Gibson 5 ... Shirley Bloomer 1 ... Althea Gibson 6 ... Adrianne Haydon 4 ... Maria Bueno 5 ... Adrianne Haydon 1 ... Althea Gibson 6 ... Angela Mortimer 2 ... Margaret Du ...

Famous quotes containing the word gibson:

    The Thirties dreamed white marble and slipstream chrome, immortal crystal and burnished bronze, but the rockets on the Gernsback pulps had fallen on London in the dead of night, screaming. After the war, everyone had a car—no wings for it—and the promised superhighway to drive it down, so that the sky itself darkened, and the fumes ate the marble and pitted the miracle crystal.
    —William Gibson (b. 1948)