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Allan Bloom

Allan David Bloom (September 14, 1930 – October 7, 1992) was an American philosopher, classicist, and academic. He studied under David Grene, Leo Strauss, Richard McKeon and Alexandre Kojève. He subsequently taught at Cornell University, the University of Toronto, Yale University, École Normale Supérieure of Paris, and the University of Chicago. Bloom championed the idea of 'Great Books' education and became famous for his criticism of contemporary American higher education, with his views being expressed in his bestselling 1987 book, The Closing of the American Mind. Although Bloom was characterized as a conservative in the popular media, Bloom explicitly stated that this was a misunderstanding, and made it clear that he was not to be affiliated with any conservative movements. Saul Bellow wrote Ravelstein, a roman à clef based on Bloom, his friend and teaching partner at the University of Chicago.

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Bibliography On Allan Bloom
... “Chicago’s Grumpy Guru Best-Selling Professor Allan Bloom and the Chicago Intellectuals.” New York Times Magazine ... "The Constitution in Full Bloom" ... "On Misunderstanding Allan Bloom The Response to The Closing of the American Mind." Academic Questions 2, no ...
Philosophy Of Education - Normative Educational Philosophies - Perennialism - Allan Bloom
... Main article Allan Bloom Date 1930-1992 Bloom, a professor of political science at the University of Chicago, argued for a traditional Great Books-based liberal ...

Famous quotes containing the words allan bloom, bloom and/or allan:

    Education in our times must try to find whatever there is in students that might yearn for completion, and to reconstruct the learning that would enable them autonomously to seek that completion.
    Allan Bloom (b. 1930–1992)

    Half-opening her lips to the frost’s morning sigh, how strangely the rose has smiled on a swift-fleeting day of September!
    How audacious it is to advance in stately manner before the blue-tit fluttering in the shrubs that have long lost their leaves, like a queen with the spring’s greeting on her lips;
    to bloom with steadfast hope that, parted from the cold flower-bed, she may be the last to cling, intoxicated, to a young hostess’s breast.
    Afanasi Fet (1820–1892)

    There the traveler meets, aghast,
    Sheeted memories of the past—
    Shrouded forms that start and sigh
    As they pass the wanderer by—
    White-robed forms of friends long given,
    In agony, to the earth—and heaven.
    —Edgar Allan Poe (1809–1849)