Who is alicia f. lieberman?

Famous quotes by alicia f. lieberman:

    Acknowledging separation feelings directly and sympathetically is the best way of coping with them. It is actually helpful to tell a toddler ‘I’ll miss you,’ or ‘I will think of you during the day,’ or ‘It is hard to say goodbye,’ or ‘I can’t wait to see you at the end of the day.’ These messages tell the child that he is important to the parent even when they are not together and that out of sight need not mean out of mind.
    Alicia F. Lieberman (20th century)

    Play is a major avenue for learning to manage anxiety. It gives the child a safe space where she can experiment at will, suspending the rules and constraints of physical and social reality. In play, the child becomes master rather than subject.... Play allows the child to transcend passivity and to become the active doer of what happens around her.
    Alicia F. Lieberman (20th century)

    Toddlerhood resembles adolescence because of the rapidity of physical growth and because of the impulse to break loose of parental boundaries. At both ages, the struggle for independence exists hand in hand with the often hidden wish to be contained and protected while striving to move forward in the world. How parents and toddlers negotiate their differences sets the stage for their ability to remain partners during childhood and through the rebellions of the teenage years.
    Alicia F. Lieberman (20th century)

    Toddlers who don’t learn gradually about disappointment lose their resilience through lack of practice in give-and-take with other people’s needs. They can become self-centered, demanding, and difficult to like or to be with.
    Alicia F. Lieberman (20th century)

    In the most desirable conditions, the child learns to manage anxiety by being exposed to just the right amounts of it, not much more and not much less. This optimal amount of anxiety varies with the child’s age and temperament. It may also vary with cultural values.... There is no mathematical formula for calculating exact amounts of optimal anxiety. This is why child rearing is an art and not a science.
    Alicia F. Lieberman (20th century)