Who are Stevens?

Some articles on stevens:

Ray Stevens (wrestler) - Personal Life
... In 1952, Stevens was married to woman wrestler Theresa Theis, who also did some work as Stevens's trainer and helped to hone his skills as a ... In 1995, the mayors of San Francisco and Oakland jointly proclaimed April 5 "Ray Stevens Day" ... On May 3, 1996, Stevens died from a heart attack while sleeping at his home in Fremont, California ...
Of Modern Poetry - Correlation With Wordsworth's Theory
... Stevens uses ordinary language, which Wordsworth stresses as vital for poetry ... role for simple language coincides with Stevens’ requirement that poetry “be living…learn the speech of the place… face the men of the time.” With this ordinary speech Wordsworth wanted to write ... The changes caused by time are key in Stevens’ work and are connected to the theatre imagery that goes throughout the poem ...
Of Modern Poetry - Analyzing The Poem
... Ordinary language and repetition help Stevens to emphasize things such as the mind ... Mixed within these many elements is Stevens’ unique imagery ... includes images that force the reader to push deeper in for Stevens’ meaning ...
Lilla Cabot Perry - Career - Paris
... possible for her to be one of the select few admitted to Alfred Stevens’ class in Paris ... Stevens was known for his “elegant interiors featuring genteel ladies lost in their reveries” ... Much of Perry’s oeuvre was influenced by the time she spent with Stevens ...
Ray Stevens (wrestler)
... Carl Ray Stevens (September 5, 1935 – May 3, 1996), better known as Ray "The Crippler" Stevens or Ray "Blond Bomber" Stevens, was an American professional wrestler ... Stevens was a wrestling superstar since the early years of the television era until he retired during the early 1990s ... Stevens wrestled as both a singles performer and in tag team matches with a variety of partners ...

More definitions of "Stevens":

  • (noun): United States filmmaker (1905-1975).
    Synonyms: George Stevens

Famous quotes containing the word stevens:

    The philosophers’ man alone still walks in dew,
    Still by the sea-side mutters milky lines
    Concerning an immaculate imagery.
    —Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)

    You could almost see the brass on her gleaming,
    Not quite. The mist was to light what red
    Is to fire. And her mainmast tapered to nothing,
    Without teetering a millimeter’s measure.
    The beads on her rails seemed to grasp at transparence.
    —Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)

    To say more than human things with human voice,
    That cannot be; to say human things with more
    Than human voice, that, also, cannot be;
    To speak humanly from the height or from the depth
    Of human things, that is acutest speech.
    —Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)