White Princess of The Jungle

White Princess of the Jungle is a jungle girl anthology comic book published quarterly by Avon Periodicals in the early 1950s. Its first issue is cover dated July 1951 and its last November 1952, for a total of 5 issues. The title's creative team includes editor Sol Cohen, and artists Everett Raymond Kinstler, Louis Ravielli, Gene Fawcette, and Vince Alascia. Issue 1 presents the origin of the White Princess of the Jungle, Taanda. Historically, Taanda is predated in literature by Sheena, (a distaff Tarzan who inspired a number of comic book jungle girls), jungle lovely Rulah, and by Rima, the heroine of William Henry Hudson's novel Green Mansions (1904). Like most comics jungle girls, Taanda is white, intelligent, voluptuous, scantily clad in animal-skin bikinis, in possession of the ability to communicate with jungle beasts and birds, and wise to the ways of cruel men. Her life is devoted to preserving the peace and beauty of the jungle, confronting men up to no good, dickering with hostile, superstitious tribesmen, and exposing the deceits of bone-rattling witch doctors. Other characters who share Taanda's book include The Blue Gorilla, Captain Courage, White Hunter Jack Barnum and special guest Sheena, Queen of the Jungle. Readers are regaled with stories such as "Slaves of the Diamond Mines", "Coils of the Monster Snake", and "Fangs of the Swamp Beast". Copies of White Princess in Near Mint condition command prices in excess of $500. Stories from White Princess were reprinted in Jungle Adventures and Top Jungle Comics during the 1960s and 1970s.

Famous quotes containing the words jungle, white and/or princess:

    Man is head, chest and stomach. Each of these animals operates, more often than not, individually. I eat, I feel, I even, although rarely, think.... This jungle crawls and teems, is hungry, roars, gets angry, devours itself, and its cacophonic concert does not even stop when you are asleep.
    René Daumal (1908–1944)

    ...black women write differently from white women. This is the most marked difference of all those combinations of black and white, male and female. It’s not so much that women write differently from men, but that black women write differently from white women. Black men don’t write very differently from white men.
    Toni Morrison (b. 1931)

    You may be a princess or the richest woman in the world, but you cannot be more than a lady.
    Jennie Jerome Churchill (1854–1921)