When Will Jesus Bring The Pork Chops?

When Will Jesus Bring the Pork Chops? (2004) is the penultimate book written by George Carlin. He came up with the title because it offends three major religions (Christianity, Judaism, and Islam). The book at first was not sold at Wal Mart for its cover, which portrays Da Vinci's The Last Supper with Carlin sitting next to the empty seat of Jesus. It is the fourth book by Carlin, the previous ones being Napalm and Silly Putty (2001), Brain Droppings (1997), and Sometimes a Little Brain Damage Can Help (1984). It was followed by the posthumous publication in 2009 of his "sortabiography" Last Words.

This book is for the most part written in the same style of Carlin's other books, but with some notable thematic differences. In general, the tone of the book is darker and more critical than his previous books in terms of its outlook on politics and society. Also, much of the book is focused on euphemisms, both as used in advertising and in politically correct language. The book also incorporates much of Carlin's standup material from across his career, taking segments from his most recent shows, as well as many of his very early performances.

An audiobook version of When Will Jesus Bring the Pork Chops?, read by Carlin, was released at the same time as the book.

Famous quotes containing the words pork, jesus and/or bring:

    The pork sizzles and cries for fish. Luckily for the foolish race, and this particularly foolish generation of trout, the night shut down at last, not a little deepened by the dark side of Ktaadn, which, like a permanent shadow, reared itself from the eastern bank.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    I have no further use for America. I wouldn’t go back there if Jesus Christ was President.
    Charlie Chaplin (1889–1977)

    At a certain age, we have already been struck by love; it no longer develops alone, according to its own mysteries and fateful laws while our hearts stand by startled and passive. We come to its assistance ... Recognizing one of its symptoms, we recall, we bring back to life the others. Since we possess its song engraved in its totality within us, we do not need for a woman to tell us the beginning—filled with admiration inspired by beauty—to find the continuation.
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)