What is writ of execution?

  • (noun): A routine court order that attempts to enforce the judgment that has been granted to a plaintiff by authorizing a sheriff to carry it out.
    Synonyms: execution

Writ Of Execution

A writ of execution (also known as an execution) is a court order granted in to put in force a judgment of possession obtained by a plaintiff from a court. When issuing a writ of execution, a court typically will order a sheriff or other similar official to take possession of property owned by a judgment debtor. Such property will often then be sold in a sheriff's sale and the proceeds remunerated to the plaintiff in partial or full satisfaction of the judgment. It is generally considered preferable for the sheriff simply to take possession of money from the defendant's bank account. If the judgment debtor owns real property, the judgment creditor can record the execution to "freeze" the title until the execution is satisfied.

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