What is wave?

  • (noun): Something that rises rapidly.
    Example: "A wave of emotion swept over him"; "there was a sudden wave of buying before the market closed"; "a wave of conservatism in the country led by the hard right"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Wave

In physics a wave is a disturbance or oscillation that travels through spacetime, accompanied by a transfer of energy. Wave motion transfers energy from one point to another, often with no permanent displacement of the particles of the medium—that is, with little or no associated mass transport. They consist, instead, of oscillations or vibrations around almost fixed locations. Waves are described by a wave equation which sets out how the disturbance proceeds over time. The mathematical form of this equation varies depending on the type of wave.

Read more about Wave.

Some articles on wave:

Kelvin Wave
... A Kelvin wave is a wave in the ocean or atmosphere that balances the Earth's Coriolis force against a topographic boundary such as a coastline, or a ... A feature of a Kelvin wave is that it is non-dispersive, i.e ... the phase speed of the wave crests is equal to the group speed of the wave energy for all frequencies ...
Wave - WKB Method
... Such nonuniform traveling waves are common in many physical problems, including the mechanics of the cochlea and waves on hanging ropes ...
Dark Wave
... Dark Wave or darkwave is a music genre that began in the late 1970s, coinciding with the popularity of New Wave and post-punk ... Building on those basic principles, dark wave added dark, introspective lyrics and an undertone of sorrow for some bands ... a subculture developed alongside dark wave music, whose members were called "wavers" or "dark wavers" ...
Dark Wave - History - Wave-atypical Influences
... bands mixed elements of dark wave and ethereal wave with later developments in electronic music ...
Birefringence - Theory
... Consider a plane wave propagating in an anisotropic medium, with a relative permittivity tensor ε, where the refractive index n, is defined by (assuming a relative magnetic ... If the wave has an electric vector of the form (2) where r is the position vector and t is time, then the wave vector k and the angular frequency ω must satisfy Maxwell's equations ... Therefore, for each direction of the wave normal, two wavevectors k are allowed ...

More definitions of "wave":

  • (noun): An undulating curve.
    Synonyms: undulation
  • (noun): A persistent and widespread unusual weather condition (especially of unusual temperatures).
  • (noun): A hairdo that creates undulations in the hair.
  • (noun): A movement like that of an ocean wave.
    Example: "A wave of settlers"; "troops advancing in waves"
  • (verb): Set waves in.
    Example: "She asked the hairdresser to wave her hair"
  • (verb): Move in a wavy pattern or with a rising and falling motion.
    Synonyms: roll, undulate, flap
  • (noun): The act of signaling by a movement of the hand.
    Synonyms: waving, wafture
  • (noun): (physics) a movement up and down or back and forth.
    Synonyms: undulation
  • (noun): A member of the women's reserve of the United States Navy; originally organized during World War II but now no longer a separate branch.
  • (verb): Twist or roll into coils or ringlets.
    Synonyms: curl
  • (noun): One of a series of ridges that moves across the surface of a liquid (especially across a large body of water).
    Synonyms: moving ridge
  • (verb): Signal with the hands or nod.
    Synonyms: beckon

Famous quotes containing the word wave:

    And his wish is intimacy,
    Intimater intimacy,
    And a stricter privacy;
    The impossible shall yet be done,
    And, being two, shall still be one.
    As the wave breaks to foam on shelves,
    Then runs into a wave again,
    So lovers melt their sundered selves,
    Yet melted would be twain.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    When disaster waves, I try not to wave back.
    Mason Cooley (b. 1927)

    “Justice” was done, and the President of the Immortals, in Æschylean phrase, had ended his sport with Tess. And the d’Urberville knights and dames slept on in their tombs unknowing. The two speechless gazers bent themselves down to the earth, as if in prayer, and remained thus a long time, absolutely motionless: the flag continued to wave silently. As soon as they had strength they arose, joined hands again, and went on.
    The End
    Thomas Hardy (1840–1928)