What is van?

  • (noun): Any creative group active in the innovation and application of new concepts and techniques in a given field (especially in the arts).
    Synonyms: avant-garde, vanguard, new wave
    See also — Additional definitions below

Van

A van is a kind of vehicle used for transporting goods or people.

Read more about Van.

Some articles on van:

Obdam - Chronology
... 1503 - The van Duvenvoorde family becomes the Lordship of the town. 1610 - Birth of Jacob, Baron van Wassenaer, Lord of Obdam Son of Jacob van Duvenvoorde van Wassenaer 1620 - Jacob van Duvenvoorde starts using the van Wassenaer family name and becomes Jacob van Duvenvoorde ... Jacob, Baron van Wassenaer, Lord of Obdam by Abraham Evertsz ...
Van, Texas - Education
... The City of Van is served by the Van Independent School District and home to the Van High School Vandals ...
Van Eyck
... Van Eyck (or van Eyck), also Van Eijk (or van Eijk) is a Dutch surname meaning "of Eyck" or "of Eijk" (literal translation "of the Oak tree") ...
Van Gogh Museum - History
... Upon Vincent van Gogh's death in 1890, his work not sold fell into the possession of his brother Theo ... six months after Vincent, leaving the work in the possession of his widow, Johanna van Gogh-Bonger ... The collection was inherited by her son Vincent Willem van Gogh in 1925, eventually loaned to the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam where it displayed for many years, and was transferred to the state-initiat ...
Famous Inhabitants of Ommen
... Albertus van Raalte (1811–1876), preacher and founder of Holland, Michigan August Pieter van Groeningen (1866–1894), writer Johanna van Buren (1881–1981 ...

More definitions of "van":

  • (noun): The leading units moving at the head of an army.
    Synonyms: vanguard
  • (noun): A camper equipped with living quarters.
    Synonyms: caravan
  • (noun): A truck with an enclosed cargo space.

Famous quotes containing the word van:

    Some have said that the thesis [of indeterminacy] is a consequence of my behaviorism. Some have said that it is a reductio ad absurdum of my behaviorism. I disagree with this second point, but I agree with the first. I hold further that the behaviorism approach is mandatory. In psychology one may or may not be a behaviorist, but in linguistics one has no choice.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Physics investigates the essential nature of the world, and biology describes a local bump. Psychology, human psychology, describes a bump on the bump.
    —Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)

    Oh, London is a man’s town, there’s power in the air;
    And Paris is a woman’s town, with flowers in her hair;
    And it’s sweet to dream in Venice, and it’s great to study Rome;
    But when it comes to living, there is no place like home.
    —Henry Van Dyke (1852–1933)