What is unit vector?

Unit Vector

In mathematics, a unit vector in a normed vector space is a vector (often a spatial vector) whose length is 1 (the unit length). A unit vector is often denoted by a lowercase letter with a "hat", like this: (pronounced "i-hat").

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Some articles on unit vector:

Unit Vector - Curvilinear Coordinates
... may be uniquely specified using a number of linearly independent unit vectors equal to the degrees of freedom of the space ... For ordinary 3-space, these vectors may be denoted ...
Spinors In Three Dimensions - Examples in Physics - Spinors of The Pauli Spin Matrices
... The Pauli matrices are a vector of three 2×2 matrices that are used as spin operators ... Given a unit vector in 3 dimensions, for example (a, b, c), one takes a dot product with the Pauli spin matrices to obtain a spin matrix for spin in the direction of the unit vector ... for spin-1/2 oriented in the direction given by the vector ...
Lambdavacuum Solution - Einstein Tensor
... A frame consists of four unit vector fields Here, the first is a timelike unit vector field and the others are spacelike unit vector fields, and is everywhere ...
Born Coordinates - Langevin Observers in The Cylindrical Chart
... the local Lorentz frames of stationary (inertial) observers Here, is a timelike unit vector field while the others are spacelike unit vector fields at ... Each integral curve of the timelike unit vector field appears in the cylindrical chart as a helix with constant radius (such as the red curve in the figure at right) ... curve (blue helical curve in the figure at right) of the spacelike basis vector, we obtain a curve which we might hope can be interpreted as a "line of simultaneity" for the ring-riding observers ...
Classical Hamiltonian Quaternions - Classical Elements of A Quaternion - Vector - Unit Vector
... A unit vector is a vector of length one ... Examples of unit vectors include i, j and k ...

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